Benzene, ACS Grade, 4 L

Benzene | 4 Liter Bottle (1.06 Gallon) | High Purity ACS Grade

Brand: Lab Alley
SKU: C2040-4L
Model # Description BrandPriceQuantity
C2040-4L Benzene, ACS, 4L Lab Alley $257.00

Description



Benzene Safety And Hazards

Benzene is a highly flammable liquid that may be fatal if swallowed or if it enters the airways. It can cause skin irritation, serious eye irritation, genetic defects, cancer and  damage to organs through prolonged or repeated exposure.

Information On Benzene From Wikipedia

Benzene is an organic chemical compound with the molecular formula C6H6. The benzene molecule is composed of six carbon atoms joined in a ring with one hydrogen atom attached to each. As it contains only carbon and hydrogen atoms, benzene is classed as a hydrocarbon. Benzene is a natural constituent of crude oil and is one of the elementary petrochemicals. Due to the cyclic continuous pi bonds between the carbon atoms, benzene is classed as an aromatic hydrocarbon, the second [n]-annulene ([6]-annulene). It is sometimes abbreviated PhH. Benzene is a colorless and highly flammable liquid with a sweet smell, and is responsible for the aroma around petrol (gasoline) stations. It is used primarily as a precursor to the manufacture of chemicals with more complex structure, such as ethylbenzene and cumene, of which billions of kilograms are produced annually. As benzene has a high octane number, aromatic derivatives like toluene and xylene typically comprise up to 25% of gasoline (petrol). Benzene itself has been limited to less than 1% in gasoline because it is a known human carcinogen. Most non-industrial applications have been limited as well for the same reason. Read more here.

Benzene Chemical Properties And Reference Resources

Benzene Derivatives

This category includes chemical compounds that are derivatives or structural analogs of benzene in which the benzene has multiple substituents or bonds. For benzene derivatives that include a phenyl group, C6H5– (benzene with only one substituent or bond), see the child category, Category:Phenyl compounds. Read more here.

Benzene Definition 

Benzene is a colorless volatile liquid hydrocarbon present in coal tar and petroleum, and used in chemical synthesis. Its use as a solvent has been reduced because of its carcinogenic properties. Benzene is a colorless volatile flammable toxic liquid aromatic hydrocarbon C6H6 used in organic synthesis, as a solvent, and as a motor fuel. Read more here.

Benzene Uses

Benzene is used in very large quantities to make other chemicals that are used to make plastics, resins, nylon, and synthetic fibers. It is used to make some types of rubbers, lubricants, dyes, detergents, drugs, and pesticides. It is also used in paints, glues, and furniture wax. Read more here. 

Benzene is used mainly as an intermediate to make other chemicals, above all ethylbenzene, cumene, cyclohexane, nitrobenzene, and alkylbenzene. More than half of the entire benzene production is processed into ethylbenzene, a precursor to styrene, which is used to make polymers and plastics like polystyrene and EPS. Some 20% of the benzene production is used to manufacture cumene, which is needed to produce phenol and acetone for resins and adhesives. Cyclohexane consumes around 10% of the world's benzene production; it is primarily used in the manufacture of nylon fibers, which are processed into textiles and engineering plastics. Smaller amounts of benzene are used to make some types of rubbers, lubricants, dyes, detergents, drugs, explosives, and pesticides. In 2013, the biggest consumer country of benzene was China, followed by the USA. Benzene production is currently expanding in the Middle East and in Africa, whereas production capacities in Western Europe and North America are stagnating. Toluene is now often used as a substitute for benzene, for instance as a fuel additive. The solvent-properties of the two are similar, but toluene is less toxic and has a wider liquid range. Toluene is also processed into benzene. Read more here.

Benzene Cancer

IARC classifies benzene as “carcinogenic to humans,” based on sufficient evidence that benzene causes acute myeloid leukemia (AML). IARC also notes that benzene exposure has been linked with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), multiple myeloma, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Read more here.

Benzene Discovery

Benzene was first discovered by the English scientist Michael Faraday in 1825 in illuminating gas. In 1834 German chemist Eilhardt Mitscherlich heated benzoic acid with lime and produced benzene. In 1845 German chemist A.W. von Hofmann isolated benzene from coal tar. Read more here.

Benzene Structure

Benzene is an organic chemical compound with the molecular formula C6H6. The benzene molecule is composed of six carbon atoms joined in a ring with one hydrogen atom attached to each. As it contains only carbon and hydrogen atoms, benzene is classed as a hydrocarbon. Read more here.

Information On Benzene From PubChem  

It is highly flammable and is formed from both natural processes and human activities. Benzene is widely used in the United States; it ranks in the top 20 chemicals for production volume. Some industries use benzene to make other chemicals which are used to make plastics, resins, and nylon and synthetic fibers.

Benzene is a clear, colorless, highly flammable and volatile, liquid aromatic hydrocarbon with a gasoline-like odor. Benzene is found in crude oils and as a by-product of oil-refining processes. In industry benzene is used as a solvent, as a chemical intermediate, and is used in the synthesis of numerous chemicals. Exposure to this substance causes neurological symptoms and affects the bone marrow causing aplastic anemia, excessive bleeding and damage to the immune system. Benzene is a known human carcinogen and is linked to an increased risk of developing lymphatic and hematopoietic cancers, acute myelogenous leukemia, as well as chronic lymphocytic leukemia.  Benzene is a colorless liquid with a sweet odor. It evaporates into the air very quickly and dissolves slightly in water. It is highly flammable and is formed from both natural processes and human activities. Benzene is widely used in the United States; it ranks in the top 20 chemicals for production volume. Some industries use benzene to make other chemicals which are used to make plastics, resins, and nylon and synthetic fibers. Benzene is also used to make some types of rubbers, lubricants, dyes, detergents, drugs, and pesticides. Natural sources of benzene include volcanoes and forest fires. Benzene is also a natural part of crude oil, gasoline, and cigarette smoke. Benzene appears as a clear colorless liquid with a petroleum-like odor. Flash point less than 0°F. Less dense than water and slightly soluble in water. Hence floats on water. Vapors are heavier than air. Read more here.

Benzene, ACS, 4 Liter Features:

CAS Number 71-43-2
Molecular Formula C6H6
Formula Weight 78.11
Assay Min 99.0%
Color (APHA) 10
Residue after Evaporation 0.001%
Substance Darkened by Sulfuric Acid To Pass Test
Thiophene To Pass Test (limit about 1 ppm)
Sulfur Compounds (as S) 0.005%
Water 0.05%



Benzene, ACS Shipping Information:
DOT: Benzene, 3, UN1114, PG II, Hazmat Fee Required

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