Potassium Metal | Ultra Pure Lab Grade | 98% Purity

Potassium Metal | Ultra Pure Lab Grade | 98% Purity

Brand: Lab Alley
SKU: C6495

HAZMAT
Model # Description BrandPriceQuantity
C6495-25g Potassium Metal, 25g Lab Alley $219.00
C6495-100g Potassium Metal, 100g Lab Alley $370.00

Description

Potassium Metal For Sale Online At LabAlley.com

  • Buy 25 Grams Of Potassium Metal For $219
  • Buy 100 Grams Of Potassium Metal For $370

Potassium Metal Features:


CAS Number 7440-09-7
Molecular Formula K
Formula Weight 39.102
Assay Approx. 98%



Potassium Metal Shipping Information:
DOT: Potassium, 4.3, UN2257, PG I

Please contact us to request a Safety Data Sheet (SDS) and Certificate of Analysis (COA) for Potassium Metal.

Information On Potassium Metal From Wikipedia

  • Potassium Metal Appearance: Soft, silvery white, light metal though normally grayish white due to oxidation.
  • Potassium Metal CAS Registry Number Number: 7440-09-7
  • Potassium PubChem CID: 5462222
  • Potassium ChemSpider ID: 4575326
  • Potassium Metal Formula: The formula for the metal is K, however the formula for the ion is K+. When we say 'potassium metal', it's not the individual atom we're talking about, but a group of K atoms bonded to each other via metallic bonding.
  • Potassium Symbol: K
  • Potassium Atomic Mass: 39.0983 u
  • Potassium Atomic number: 19
  • Potassium Electron configuration: [Ar] 4s¹
  • Potassium Discoverer: Humphry Davy
  • Potassium Daily intake: Summary: A healthy adult should aim to consume 3,500–4,700 mg of potassium daily from foods. Certain groups of people should aim to consume at least 4,700 mg per day.
  • Potassium Metal Appearance: ‎Soft, silvery metal
  • Potassium Metal Melting Point‎: ‎63.25 °C
  • Potassium Metal Specific Heat‎: ‎0.180 Cal/g/K @ 25 °C
  • Potassium Metal Boiling Point‎: ‎760 °C

Potassium metal was first isolated in 1807 by Humphry Davy, who derived it by electrolysis of molten KOH with the newly discovered voltaic pile. Potassium was the first metal that was isolated by electrolysis. Later in the same year, Davy reported extraction of the metal sodium from a mineral derivative (caustic soda, NaOH, or lye) rather than a plant salt, by a similar technique, demonstrating that the elements, and thus the salts, are different. Although the production of potassium and sodium metal should have shown that both are elements, it took some time before this view was universally accepted.

Because of the sensitivity of potassium to water and air, air-free techniques are normally employed for handling the element. It is unreactive toward nitrogen and saturated hydrocarbons such as mineral oil or kerosene. It readily dissolves in liquid ammonia, up to 480 g per 1000 g of ammonia at 0 °C. Depending on the concentration, the ammonia solutions are blue to yellow, and their electrical conductivity is similar to that of liquid metals. Potassium slowly reacts with ammonia to form KNH2, but this reaction is accelerated by minute amounts of transition metal salts.[49] Because it can reduce the salts to the metal, potassium is often used as the reductant in the preparation of finely divided metals from their salts by the Rieke method.

Potassium Metal In Water | Potassium metal reacts very rapidly with water to form a colourless basic solution of potassium hydroxide (KOH) and hydrogen gas (H2). The reaction continues even when the solution becomes basic. The resulting solution is basic because of the dissolved hydroxide. The reaction is exothermic. Read more here.

Information On Potassium From Wikipedia

Potassium is a chemical element with the symbol K (from Neo-Latin kalium) and atomic number 19. Potassium is a silvery-white metal that is soft enough to be cut with a knife with little force. Potassium metal reacts rapidly with atmospheric oxygen to form flaky white potassium peroxide in only seconds of exposure. It was first isolated from potash, the ashes of plants, from which its name derives. In the periodic table, potassium is one of the alkali metals, all of which have a single valence electron in the outer electron shell, that is easily removed to create an ion with a positive charge – a cation, that combines with anions to form salts. Potassium in nature occurs only in ionic salts. Elemental potassium reacts vigorously with water, generating sufficient heat to ignite hydrogen emitted in the reaction, and burning with a lilac-colored flame. It is found dissolved in sea water (which is 0.04% potassium by weight), and occurs in many minerals such as orthoclase, a common constituent of granites and other igneous rocks.

Potassium is chemically very similar to sodium, the previous element in group 1 of the periodic table. They have a similar first ionization energy, which allows for each atom to give up its sole outer electron. It was suspected in 1702 that they were distinct elements that combine with the same anions to make similar salts,[8] and was proven in 1807 using electrolysis. Naturally occurring potassium is composed of three isotopes, of which 40K is radioactive. Traces of 40
K are found in all potassium, and it is the most common radioisotope in the human body.

Potassium ions are vital for the functioning of all living cells. The transfer of potassium ions across nerve cell membranes is necessary for normal nerve transmission; potassium deficiency and excess can each result in numerous signs and symptoms, including an abnormal heart rhythm and various electrocardiographic abnormalities. Fresh fruits and vegetables are good dietary sources of potassium. The body responds to the influx of dietary potassium, which raises serum potassium levels, with a shift of potassium from outside to inside cells and an increase in potassium excretion by the kidneys.

Most industrial applications of potassium exploit the high solubility in water of potassium compounds, such as potassium soaps. Heavy crop production rapidly depletes the soil of potassium, and this can be remedied with agricultural fertilizers containing potassium, accounting for 95% of global potassium chemical production.

More Information About About Potassium Metal

Potassium metal is an abundant element, which in its pure form is a silvery white, light metal and it is very reactive. Potassium Metal is available as disc, granules, ingot, pellets, pieces, powder , rod, wire, and sputtering target. American Elements produces to many standard grades when applicable, including Mil Spec (military grade); ACS, Reagent and Technical Grade; Food, Agricultural and Pharmaceutical Grade; Optical Grade, USP and EP/BP (European Pharmacopoeia/British Pharmacopoeia) and follows applicable ASTM testing standards. Typical and custom packaging is available. Ultra high purity and high purity forms also include metal powder, submicron powder and nanoscale, quantum dots, targets for thin film deposition, pellets for evaporation and single crystal or polycrystalline forms. Elements can also be introduced into alloys or other systems as fluorides, oxides or chlorides or as solutions. Potassium metal is generally immediately available in most volumes. American Elements produces to many standard grades when applicable, including Mil Spec (military grade); ACS, Reagent and Technical Grade; Food, Agricultural and Pharmaceutical Grade; Optical Grade, USP and EP/BP (European Pharmacopoeia/British Pharmacopoeia) and follows applicable ASTM testing standards. Typical and custom packaging is available. Additional technical, research and safety (MSDS) information is available as is a Reference Calculator for converting relevant units of measurement.

Potassium Metal In Water

Potassium metal reacts very rapidly with water to form a colourless basic solution of potassium hydroxide (KOH) and hydrogen gas (H2). The reaction continues even when the solution becomes basic. The resulting solution is basic because of the dissolved hydroxide. The reaction is exothermic. Read more here.

Potassium Metal Hazards

Elemental potassium is an odorless silver metal solid that reacts violently with water, acids and oxygenated compounds. Potassium can ignite in moist air or because of friction or static sparks. It is highly corrosive to eyes, skin and mucous membranes. Read more here.

 

Potassium Metal Reacting With The Oxygen In The Air | YouTube Video

 

 

 

Reaction Of Potassium And Water | YouTube Video