Cold Finger Condenser

Cold Finger Condenser

Brand: Lab Alley
SKU: 07-746 (EA)
Model # DescriptionMin. in packBrandPriceQuantity
07-746 (EA)

 



EA Lab Alley $140.00
Due to Covid 19, we are only fulfilling our existing orders. More stock is on its way for new orders. Re-opening in 2 weeks.

Description

Buy A Cold Finger Type Condenser For $140 At LabAlley.com

  • High Quality Cold Finger Reflux Condensers For Sale
  • Use As A Cold Trap To Generate A Localized Cold Surface
  • Use For Sublimation Or Reflux And Distillation Operations
  • Cold Finger Condenser Price: $140
  • Buy Glass Cold Finger Type Condensers Online At LabAlley.com
  • Cold finger Condensers Have An Inner Joint And Sealed Lower Drip Tip For Drop Control
  • Buy Laboratory Glassware Here

About Cold Fingers From Wikipedia

A cold finger is a piece of laboratory equipment that is used to generate a localized cold surface. It is named for its resemblance to a finger and is a type of cold trap. The device usually consists of a chamber that a coolant fluid (cold tap water, or perhaps something colder) can enter and leave. Another version involves filling the device with a cold material (examples: ice, dry ice or a mixture such as dry ice/acetone or ice/water).

Typically a cold finger is used in a sublimation apparatus,[2] or can be used as a compact version of a condenser in either reflux reaction or distillation apparatus. Many commercially available rotary evaporators can be purchased with a cold finger in place of a Dimroth condenser, for example. When used as a condenser in a rotary evaporator, cold fingers can be cooled to a lower temperature of −78 °C (dry ice), compared with water condensers that can be cooled to −40 °C (ethylene glycol/water mixture). The lower temperature achieved reduces the quantity of volatile material exhausted into the air. Read more here.

Why Is A Cold Finger Used In Sublimation?

Because a vacuum has no pressure, the substance, with a few other factors, can reach this vapor pressure almost instantly and skip the liquid phase. Ice is then applied to the cold finger. The ice serves as a cooling agent, which induces the pure product to form on the cold finger. Read more here.