Glycerol Reagent, 500 mL
Glycerol Reagent, 4 Liters

Glycerin, High Purity Reagent Grade

Brand: Lab Alley
SKU: C4170
Model # Description BrandPriceQuantity
C4170-500ml Glycerol Reagent, 500 mL Lab Alley $15.00
C4170-4L Glycerol Reagent, 4 Liters Lab Alley $50.00

Description
  • Buy A 16 Ounce (500ml) Bottle Of Antiviral Glycerol
  • Buy A 1 Gallon (4 Liter) Bottle Of Antiviral Glycerol
  • Antivirial Glycerol sold online at LabAlley.com is classified as Reagent Grade, Technical Grade and AR (Analytical Reagent) Grade
  • Glycerol CAS Registration Number
  • Glycerol Formula C3H8O3

Glycerin is mildly antimicrobial and antiviral and is an FDA approved treatment for wounds. It is suggested that, on the basis of this study, glycerol can reduce intracellular virus infectivity but that its effects are very dependent on concentration, time and temperature.

Synonyms: Glycerin, High Purity Reagent Grade, Ingredient For Creams, Lotions & Skin Care Products

Glycerol Reagent Features:

CAS Number 56-81-5
Molecular Formula C3H8O3
Formula Weight 92.10
Assay Min. 99.5%
Dilution Test To Pass Test
Chlorinated compounds 0.003%
Color APHA Max. 10
Heavy Metals 2 ppm
Fatty Acid Esters 0.05%
Neutrality To Pass Test
Acrolein & Glucose To Pass Test
Residue after Ignition 0.005%
Sulfate 0.001%
Water 0.5%
Substances Darkened by Sulfuric Acid To Pass Test

 

Please contact us to request a Safety Data Sheet (SDS) and Certificate of Analysis (COA) for Glycerol Reagent.

Buy Glycerol |  ≥99.5% | For Sale Online | ACS Reagent Grade For Sale Online | Colorless, Odorless, Viscous Liquid | Non-Toxic | UPS/Lab Grade | Used In Wound & Burn Treatments | CAS RN 56-81-5 | C3H8O3 | Bulk Wholesale Supplier

Lab Grade Glycerin For Sale | Technical Grade And AR (Analytical Reagent) Grade Glycerol | Antiviral Liquid | CAS RN 56-81-5 | Formula C3H8O3

Reagent Grade Glycerol For Sale | ≥99.5% | Antiviral Liquid | CAS RN 56-81-5 | Formula C3H8O3

Food Grade Glycerin For Sale | USP And FCC Grade Glycerol | 99% Purity | Food And Favor Ingredient | Antiviral Liquid

Vegetable Glycerin For Sale | Food Grade Glycerin | Antiviral Liquid | Food Ingredient | Natural Glycerol | Kosher

Buy Glycerol (Glycerin) In Bulk Here Or By Phone: 512-668-9918

If you have questions about ordering glycerin (glycerol) in bulk online here at LabAlley.com or would like to place an order, call 512-668-9918 or email customerservice@laballey.com to talk with a glycerin specialist. Contact Lab Alley to request an Safety Data Sheet. Use a 10% discount code to buy glycerin (glycerol) online here.

Glycerol (Glycerin) Chemical Properties And Reference Information

What Is Glycerin Used For?

This medication is used as a moisturizer to treat or prevent dry, rough, scaly, itchy skin and minor skin irritations (e.g., diaper rash, skin burns from radiation therapy). Emollients are substances that soften and moisturize the skin and decrease itching and flaking. Read more here.

Is Glycerin Safe?

As with almost any substance, a small number of people have sensitivities or allergies to glycerin and it can be toxic if consumed in sufficient quantities. But as it's typically used, to keep foods fresh or as a low-glycemic sweetener, glycerin is generally safe. It is not, however, calorie-free. Read more here.

Is Glycerin Natural?

Chemical-derived glycerin is an alcohol, in the form of a thick liquid that is soluble in other alcohols and water, which is why it is added to many synthetic skin care products. Natural glycerin is not a chemical or alcohol; it is derived from plant-based oils. Read more here.

What Is Glycerol Used For In The Body?

Glycerol is a three-carbon substance that forms the backbone of fatty acids in fats. When the body uses stored fat as a source of energy, glycerol and fatty acids are released into the bloodstream. The glycerol component can be converted into glucose by the liver and provides energy for cellular metabolism. Read more here.

Glycerol (Glycerin) Safety And Hazards

The chemical has been verified to be of low concern based on experimental and modeled data. This chemical is combustible. Gives off irritating or toxic fumes (or gases) in a fire. Glycerin dropped on the human eye causes a strong stinging and burning sensation, with tearing and dilation of the conjunctival vessels, but no obvious injury. Read more here.

What Is An Example Of Glycerol?

A sweet, syrupy liquid obtained from animal fats and oils or by the fermentation of glucose. It is used as a solvent, sweetener, and antifreeze and in making explosives and soaps. Glycerol consists of a propane molecule attached to three hydroxyl (OH) groups. Also called glycerin, glycerine. Chemical formula: C3H8O3. Read more here.

Glycerin For Hair

Glycerin is heavy in humectants, which are made to pull moisture into the hair and retain it. However, it also works the other way. “If the environment around the hair is drier than the hair, it is possible for humectants to push moisture from the hair to the dry air to help balance the moisture in the atmosphere. Read more here.

What Is Glycerin For Baking

Glycerine is mainly used to prevent a very hard set with royal icing but can also be added to cake recipes to keep your baking moist for longer. Glycerine also helps to prevent sugar crystallization in candy making. Read more here.

Glycerol Inactivates Viruses

Effect of glycerol on intracellular virus survival: implications for the clinical use of glycerol-preserved cadaver skin. 

Glycerol has long been used for the preservation of skin allografts. The antimicrobial activity of glycerol has not been fully documented. This paper reports the results of an investigation of a model studying the effect of glycerol on the inactivation of intracellular viruses. Two viruses--herpes simplex type I (HSV-1) and poliovirus--were cultured within human dermal fibroblasts. These intracellular viruses were incubated with 50 per cent, 85 per cent and 98 per cent glycerol at 4 degrees C and 20 degrees C for 4 weeks. Each week, the cultures in glycerol and controls in fibroblast maintenance medium were assayed for virus infectivity by examining the ability of harvested viruses to infect further fibroblasts. At 4 degrees C, 85 per cent glycerol could not fully inactivate intracellular HSV-I or poliovirus even after 4 weeks; 98 per cent glycerol inactivated intracellular HSV-I (after 3 weeks) but could not fully inactivate intracellular poliovirus after 4 weeks. At 20 degrees C, 85 per cent glycerol inactivated intracellular HSV-I (within 1 week) but could not fully inactivate intracellular poliovirus after 4 weeks; 98 per cent glycerol inactivated intracellular HSV-I (within 1 week) and inactivated intracellular poliovirus (after 2 weeks). It is suggested that, on the basis of this study, glycerol can reduce intracellular virus infectivity but that its effects are very dependent on concentration, time and temperature such that we would recommend that allograft skin be exposed to 98 per cent glycerol for a minimum of at least 4 weeks at a minimum temperature of 20 degrees C before clinical use.

Monolaurin, also known as glycerol monolaurate (GML), glyceryl laurate or 1-lauroyl-glycerol, is a monoglyceride. It is the mono-ester formed from glycerol and lauric acid. Monolaurin is known to inactivate lipid-coated viruses by binding to the lipid-protein envelope of the virus, thereby preventing it from attaching and entering host cells, making infection and replication impossible. Other studies show that Monolaurin disintegrates the protective viral envelope, killing the virus.Monolaurin has been studied to inactivate many pathogens including Herpes simplex virus and Chlamydia trachomatis. Read more here.

Glycerol Methods Of Viral Inactivation For Skin 

At concentrations of 70% or higher, glycerol was found to completely inactivate cell-free HIV-1 within 30 minutes at 4 °C (1). Cell- or skin-associated HIV-1, however, was not totally eliminated with 70% or 85% glycerol at 4 °C. Cell- or skinassociated HIV-1 was recovered after storage in 85% glycerol at 4 °C for up to 72 hours, but virus isolation was infrequent after storage for more than five days. At 20 °C or 37 °C, either 70% or 85% glycerol could inactivate cell- or skin-associated HIV-1 within eight hours. The article reporting those results addresses the importance of washing test articles to remove glycerol that may interfere with the biological test system (1). In that article, the de Backere (2) procedure was used, except that the glycerolization procedure was performed at 37 °C instead of 33 °C. Glycerol was found to be effective for inactivating HSV-1 and polio as model intracellular viruses in cadaver skin, but only under certain conditions (3). At 4 °C, 85% glycerol could not fully inactivate intracellular HSV-1 or polio even after four weeks. At 20 °C, 85% glycerol inactivated intracellular HSV-1 within one week but could not fully inactivate polio after four weeks. HSV-1 was inactivated by 98% glycerol within one week and polio within two weeks. Extracellular HSV-1 was inactivated by 85% glycerol at 4 °C, but a 50-day incubation was required. Polio, however, survived even after 50 days at 4 °C. At 37 °C, 24 hours were needed to completely inactivate polio (4,5). Experiments performed in a virus transport medium containing either 85% or 98% glycerol at 4 °C, 20 °C, or 37 °C showed that 98% glycerol completely inactivated both HSV-1 and polio at either 4 °C or 20 °C (5). Table 2 summarizes glycerol methods of viral inactivation for skin. Read more here.

Glycerin Allergy

Glycerin is a rare sensitizer and is widely used for cosmetics, medicine, and food for its stable, nontoxic properties. Our case suggests that glycerin can be a cause of contact urticaria syndrome and even anaphylaxis, although allergic reactions to glycerin are very rare. Read more here.

Glycerin For Fondant

Glycerine's functionality is a "moisturizer", in that it's very good at keeping moisture for a long period. In the case of fondant, it will help to keep it pliable for a longer period and help to minimize drying out too quickly when working with it (rolling out, icing sugar/cornstarch, application). Read more here.

Glycerin For Cooking

Glycerin for culinary use is a thick, clear, syrupy looking liquid used primarily in sweets to retain moisture and enhance sweetness. It is also used in candy making, such as fondant, to keep the candy from crystallizing. The ingredient may also be used in royal icing to keep it from getting hard. Read more here.

Can Vegans Have Glycerin?

Glycerine | Some products use vegetable glycerin, which is suitable for vegans. It can be derived from soya, coconut oil, or palm oil (which some vegans choose to avoid). Read more here.

Glycerin For Skin

Glycerin is a humectant, a type of moisturizing agent that pulls water into the outer layer of your skin from deeper levels of your skin and the air. In skin care products, glycerin is commonly used with occlusives, another type of moisturizing agent, to trap the moisture that it draws into the skin. Read more here.

Glycerin (Glycerine) For Face

Glycerin is very good for oily skin as it draws water from the air into your skin to moisturise it without making it greasy. The humectants in glycerin also lock in the moisture in your skin to keep it hydrated. Oily skin that is prone to acne and inflammation will benefit from the skin-soothing properties of glycerin. Read more here.

Glycerin Structure

Glycerol is a nontoxic, sweet tasting, and viscous fluid that has the chemical formula C3H8O3. It is a polyol, a compound that is made up of more than one hydroxyl group. Its chemical structure consists of three hydroxyl groups, which are -OH groups attached to the carbon atoms. Read more here.

Glycerin For Dogs

Glycerin doesn't provide much nutritional benefit to your pet. Glycerin that is derived from animal and plant sources is generally considered a 'safe', albeit nutritionally void ingredient. Risks: Some pet food manufacturers are using Glycerin that is derived from biofuel (e.g. diesel fuel) processing. Read more here.

What Kind Of Glycerin Is Used For Bubbles?

Measure 6 cups of water into one container, then pour 1 cup of dish soap into the water and slowly stir it until the soap is mixed in. Try not to let foam or bubbles form while you stir. Measure 1 tablespoon of glycerin or 1/4 cup of corn syrup and add it to the container. Stir the solution until it is mixed together. Read more here.

Is Glycerin Toxic For Dogs?

Greenies Teenie Dental Dog Treats | The glycerin is vegetable based – no animal sources. Glycerin is a three-carbon molecule that is found in fats and oils. It is considered GRAS or generally recognized as safe in animal foods. Glycerin is sweet but its primary benefit for these treats is to control moisture. Read more here.

Glycerin For Lips

For soft and pink lips, there is nothing better than glycerin. It is also the best treatment for chapped as well as dark lips. Glycerin works very well with lemon juice, whether it is for your face or lips. Mix the two together to treat dry, chapped lips and prevent flaking and bleeding. Read more here.

Can You Mix Glycerin With Essential Oils?

One is glycerine, a non-fermented alcohol which is very skin friendly, inexpensive and easy to obtain. It does not completely break down all essential oils, but does enough of a job that the essential oil is dispersed safely when adding water. ... drop essential oil to 1 ml glycerine or alcohol. Read more here.

Glycerin With Rose Water

To make your own rosewater and glycerin toner: simply, mix 1 1/2 cups of rose water and 1/4th cup of glycerin. Pour in a spray bottle. Shake well before use. As a precaution, spray on your wrist before using it on your face. Read more here.

 

Information On Glycerin From Wikipedia

Glycerol (also called glycerine or glycerin) is a simple polyol compound. It is a colorless, odorless, viscous liquid that is sweet-tasting and non-toxic. The glycerol backbone is found in those lipids known as glycerides. Due to having antimicrobial and antiviral properties it is widely used in FDA approved wound and burn treatments. It can also be used as an effective marker to measure liver disease. It is also widely used as a sweetener in the food industry and as a humectant in pharmaceutical formulations. Owing to the presence of three hydroxyl groups, glycerol is miscible with water and is hygroscopic in nature.

Food Industry 

In food and beverages, glycerol serves as a humectant, solvent, and sweetener, and may help preserve foods. It is also used as filler in commercially prepared low-fat foods (e.g., cookies), and as a thickening agent in liqueurs. Glycerol and water are used to preserve certain types of plant leaves. As a sugar substitute, it has approximately 27 kilocalories per teaspoon (sugar has 20) and is 60% as sweet as sucrose. It does not feed the bacteria that form plaques and cause dental cavities.[citation needed] As a food additive, glycerol is labeled as E number E422. It is added to icing (frosting) to prevent it from setting too hard.

As used in foods, glycerol is categorized by the U.S. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics as a carbohydrate. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) carbohydrate designation includes all caloric macronutrients excluding protein and fat. Glycerol has a caloric density similar to table sugar, but a lower glycemic index and different metabolic pathway within the body, so some dietary advocates accept glycerol as a sweetener compatible with low-carbohydrate diets.

It is also recommended as an additive when using polyol sweeteners such as erythritol and xylitol which have a cooling effect, due to its heating effect in the mouth, if the cooling effect is not wanted.

Medical, Pharmaceutical And Personal Care Applications

Glycerin is mildly antimicrobial and antiviral and is an FDA approved treatment for wounds. The Red Cross reports that an 85% solution of glycerin shows bactericidal and antiviral effects, and wounds treated with glycerin show reduced inflammation after roughly 2 hours. Due to this it is used widely in wound care products, including glycerin based hydrogel sheets for burns and other wound care. It is approved for all types of wound care except third degree burns, and is used to package donor skin used in skin grafts. There is no topical treatment approved for third degree burns, and so this limitation is not exclusive to glycerin. 

Glycerol is used in medical, pharmaceutical and personal care preparations, often as a means of improving smoothness, providing lubrication, and as a humectant. 

Ichthyosis and xerosis have been relieved by the topical use glycerin. It is found in allergen immunotherapies, cough syrups, elixirs and expectorants, toothpaste, mouthwashes, skin care products, shaving cream, hair care products, soaps, and water-based personal lubricants. In solid dosage forms like tablets, glycerol is used as a tablet holding agent. For human consumption, glycerol is classified by the U.S. FDA among the sugar alcohols as a caloric macronutrient. Glycerol is also used in blood banking to preserve red blood cells prior to freezing. 

Glycerol is a component of glycerin soap. Essential oils are added for fragrance. This kind of soap is used by people with sensitive, easily irritated skin because it prevents skin dryness with its moisturizing properties. It draws moisture up through skin layers and slows or prevents excessive drying and evaporation. 

Taken rectally, glycerol functions as a laxative by irritating the anal mucosa and inducing a hyperosmotic effect, expanding the colon by drawing water into it to induce peristalsis resulting in evacuation. It may be administered undiluted either as a suppository or as a small-volume (2–10 ml) enema. Alternatively, it may be administered in a dilute solution, e.g., 5%, as a high volume enema. 

Taken orally (often mixed with fruit juice to reduce its sweet taste), glycerol can cause a rapid, temporary decrease in the internal pressure of the eye. This can be useful for the initial emergency treatment of severely elevated eye pressure. 

Glycerol has also been incorporated as a component of bio-ink formulations in the field of bioprinting. The glycerol content acts to add viscosity to the bio-ink without adding large protein, carbohydrate, or glycoprotein molecules.

Botanical Extracts 

When utilized in "tincture" method extractions, specifically as a 10% solution, glycerol prevents tannins from precipitating in ethanol extracts of plants (tinctures). It is also used as an "alcohol-free" alternative to ethanol as a solvent in preparing herbal extractions. It is less extractive when utilized in a standard tincture methodology. Alcohol-based tinctures can also have the alcohol removed and replaced with glycerol for its preserving properties. Such products are not "alcohol-free" in a scientific sense, as glycerol contains three hydroxyl groups. Fluid extract manufacturers often extract herbs in hot water before adding glycerol to make glycerites. 

When used as a primary "true" alcohol-free botanical extraction solvent in non-tincture based methodologies, glycerol has been shown to possess a high degree of extractive versatility for botanicals including removal of numerous constituents and complex compounds, with an extractive power that can rival that of alcohol and water–alcohol solutions. That glycerol possesses such high extractive power assumes it is utilized with dynamic methodologies as opposed to standard passive "tincturing" methodologies that are better suited to alcohol. Glycerol possesses the intrinsic property of not denaturing or rendering a botanical's constituents inert (as alcohols – i.e. ethyl (grain) alcohol, methyl (wood) alcohol, etc., do). Glycerol is a stable preserving agent for botanical extracts that, when utilized in proper concentrations in an extraction solvent base, does not allow inverting or reduction-oxidation of a finished extract's constituents, even over several years.[citation needed] Both glycerol and ethanol are viable preserving agents. Glycerol is bacteriostatic in its action, and ethanol is bactericidal in its action.

Antifreeze

Like ethylene glycol and propylene glycol, glycerol is a non-ionic kosmotrope that forms strong hydrogen bonds with water molecules, competing with water-water hydrogen bonds. This interaction disrupts the formation of ice. The minimum freezing point temperature is about −36 °F (−38 °C) corresponding to 70% glycerol in water.

Glycerol was historically used as an anti-freeze for automotive applications before being replaced by ethylene glycol, which has a lower freezing point. While the minimum freezing point of a glycerol-water mixture is higher than an ethylene glycol-water mixture, glycerol is not toxic and is being re-examined for use in automotive applications.

In the laboratory, glycerol is a common component of solvents for enzymatic reagents stored at temperatures below 0 °C due to the depression of the freezing temperature. It is also used as a cryoprotectant where the glycerol is dissolved in water to reduce damage by ice crystals to laboratory organisms that are stored in frozen solutions, such as bacteria, nematodes, and mammalian embryos.

Chemical Intermediate

Glycerol is used to produce nitroglycerin, which is an essential ingredient of various explosives such as dynamite, gelignite, and propellants like cordite. Reliance on soap-making to supply co-product glycerol made it difficult to increase production to meet wartime demand. Hence, synthetic glycerol processes were national defense priorities in the days leading up to World War II. Nitroglycerin, also known as glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) is commonly used to relieve angina pectoris, taken in the form of sub-lingual tablets, or as an aerosol spray. An oxidation of glycerol affords mesoxalic acid.

Vibration Damping

Glycerol is used as fill for pressure gauges to damp vibration. External vibrations, from compressors, engines, pumps, etc., produce harmonic vibrations within Bourdon gauges that can cause the needle to move excessively, giving inaccurate readings. The excessive swinging of the needle can also damage internal gears or other components, causing premature wear. Glycerol, when poured into a gauge to replace the air space, reduces the harmonic vibrations that are transmitted to the needle, increasing the lifetime and reliability of the gauge.

Niche Uses

Film industry
Glycerol is used by the film industry when filming scenes involving water to stop areas from drying out too quickly.

Glycerine is used—combined with water (around in a 1:99 proportion)—to create a smooth smoky environment. The solution is vaporized and pushed into the room with a ventilator.

Ultrasonic couplant
Glycerol can be sometimes used as replacement for water in ultrasonic testing, as it has favourably higher acoustic impedance (2.42MRayl vs 1.483MRayl for water) while being relatively safe, non-toxic, non-corrosive and relatively low cost.

Bubble Mixture
Glycerol is added to bubble mixture for blowing soap bubbles. It creates longer-lasting bubbles by reducing water evaporation.

Internal combustion fuel
Glycerol is also used to power diesel generators supplying electricity for the FIA Formula E series of electric race cars.

Information On Glycerol (Glycerin) From PubChem 

Glycerol or glycerin is a colourless, odourless, viscous liquid that is sweet-tasting and mostly non-toxic. It is widely used in the food industry as a sweetener and humectant and in pharmaceutical formulations. Glycerol is an important component of triglycerides (i. e. fats and oils) and of phospholipids. Glycerol is a three-carbon substance that forms the backbone of fatty acids in fats. When the body uses stored fat as a source of energy, glycerol and fatty acids are released into the bloodstream. The glycerol component can be converted into glucose by the liver and provides energy for cellular metabolism. Normally, glycerol shows very little acute toxicity and very high oral doses or acute exposures can be tolerated. On the other hand, chronically high levels of glycerol in the blood are associated with glycerol kinase deficiency (GKD). GKD causes the condition known as hyperglycerolemia, an accumulation of glycerol in the blood and urine. There are three clinically distinct forms of GKD: infantile, juvenile, and adult. The infantile form is the most severe and is associated with vomiting, lethargy, severe developmental delay, and adrenal insufficiency. The mechanisms of glycerol toxicity in infants are not known, but it appears to shift metabolism towards chronic acidosis. Acidosis typically occurs when arterial pH falls below 7. 35. In infants with acidosis, the initial symptoms include poor feeding, vomiting, loss of appetite, weak muscle tone (hypotonia), and lack of energy (lethargy). These can progress to heart, liver, and kidney abnormalities, seizures, coma, and possibly death. These are also the characteristic symptoms of untreated GKD. Many affected children with organic acidemias experience intellectual disability or delayed development. Patients with the adult form of GKD generally have no symptoms and are often detected fortuitously. Glycerol is a triol with a structure of propane substituted at positions 1, 2 and 3 by hydroxy groups. It has a role as an osmolyte, a solvent, a detergent, a human metabolite, an algal metabolite, a Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolite, an Escherichia coli metabolite and a mouse metabolite. It is an alditol and a triol. Glycerin is a trihydroxyalcohol with localized osmotic diuretic and laxative effects. Glycerin elevates the blood plasma osmolality thereby extracting water from tissues into interstitial fluid and plasma. This agent also prevents water reabsorption in the proximal tubule in the kidney leading to an increase in water and sodium excretion and a reduction in blood volume. Administered rectally, glycerin exerts a hyperosmotic laxative effect by attracting water into the rectum, thereby relieving constipation. In addition, glycerin is used as a solvent, humectant and vehicle in various pharmaceutical preparations.

Glycerol vs Glycerin

Glycerols are the triol compound used for many purposes in pure or mixed form, but glycerine is the commercial name of glycerol, which is not pure ,which contain mostly 95% of glycerol , it can't be used when pure glycerol is required . Glycerin and glycerol are both names for the same molecule. Read more here.

What Is Glycerin Oil?

Vegetable glycerin, also known as glycerol or glycerine, is a clear liquid typically made from soybean, coconut or palm oils. It is odorless and has a mild, sweet taste with a syrup-like consistency. Read more here.

Can I Buy Glycerin At The Supermarket?

Where to Buy Food Grade Vegetable Glycerin. Vegetable Glycerin (VG) can be found in most pharmacies. There's a good chance you can find it in your local supermarket or big box store. Oftentimes products are being sold for external use only and have added ingredients. Read more here.

Buy Safe Ingredients And Chemicals For DIY Homemade Cosmetics, Makeup, Lotions, Soaps, Household Cleaning Products, Laboratory Sterilization, Food And Beverage Processing, Skin Care Formulations, Hospital Disinfectants, Personal Care Products, Botanical And Essential Oils, Botanical Extracts, Pharmaceutical Drugs, Herbal Tinctures, Kid Safe Pools, Pest Control Products, Lawn Care Products, Chemistry Labs, Natural Health Supplements And Vitamins, Virus Disinfection Products, Perfumes, Hospital Grade Detergents, Disinfecting Wipes And Disinfectant Sprays At LabAlley.com

Buy lab supplies, laboratory glassware, chemical crystals and powders, oils, gels, spray bottles and stock chemical solutions to make virus disinfectants here. You can also buy other compounds and additives for safe cosmetics and personal care products at LabAlley.com. Find out how chemicals are made, sold, priced, bought, shipped and used in the United States here.

Popular additives for skin care products purchased online in bulk at wholesale prices at LabAlley.com include food grade ethanol, 100% alcohol, 95% alcohol, 70% alcohol, 99% isopropyl alcohol, 91% isopropyl alcohol, 70% isopropyl alcohol, 3% hydrogen peroxide, 6% hydrogen peroxidefood grade hydrogen peroxide, food grade (FCC) vegetable glycerin, Food Grade (FCC) glycerol, solvents, aqueous acids and acids in crystalline powder form.

Shop for popular ingredients used to formulate DIY homemade personal care products such as high purity water, citric acid, menthol crystalsnatural peppermint oil, Polysorbate 80, phenol, trichloroacetic acid  (TCC), denatured alcoholn-Propanol, MCT (Coconut Oil), sodium hypochloritesalicylic acid, fumaric acidsodium hydroxide, triethanolaminebenzalkonium chloridetriethylene glycolpropylene glycol, ammonium hydroxide, olive oil at LabAlley.com. Buy lab supplies, chemical powders, oils, gels, spray bottles and chemical solutions to make virus disinfectants here at LabAlley.com