Buy Kid Safe Chemicals And Child Safe Cleaning Products

Kid Safe Chemicals Definition | Safer Chemicals Healthy Families | EWG | Kid Safe Chemicals Act | Buy Kid Safe Pool Chemicals & Household Cleaning Ingredients For USA Homes

Buy Kid Safe Chemicals, Safe Organic Ingredients And Safe Household Cleaning Solutions Online Or By Phone In The U.S. 

If you have questions regarding the personal safety and health ramifications of the 'Kid Safe Chemicals' or child safe cleaning products you want to buy, call 512-668-9918 or email customerservice@LabAlley.comBuy ingredients for safe recipes for DIY homemade hand sanitizers here. Find out how to kill viruses here.

Buy bulk antiviral chemical compounds, antiviral drug components, antiviral substances, antiviral cleaning products and antiviral medication ingredients online at LabAlley.com. 

American consumers buy kid safe chemicals, safer organic household chemicals, pet safe chemicals, bulk cosmetic supplies and food grade ingredients online here.

Learn how to protect your sons and daughters from ingesting a dangerous chemical or poisonous substance here. Conscientious parents can learn about harmful chemicals that should be avoided here.  

Special Orders And Safety Recommendations

If you can not find the right kid safe products online at LabAlley.com to ensure the safety of your children, please call 512-668-9918 to speak with a Kid Safe Product Specialist. 

If you use the search function on this web site and can not locate the organic ingredient or safe substance you are looking for, contact us and we may be able to special order it for you. If you want to buy chemicals to prevent damage to the environment, contact us at 512-668-9918 for recommendations.

Buy 70% Ethyl Alcohol And 70% Isopropyl Alcohol For Sterilization And To Kill Viruses And Bacteria

Ethyl Alcohol (70%) is the most effective concentration for bactericidal and virucidal uses70% ethyl alcohol sold by LabAlley.com is a potent cleaning agent used to kill viruses, destroy microbes, denature proteins and dissolves lipid (fat) membranes surrounding viruses. Alcohol denatures proteins by disrupting the side chain intramolecular hydrogen bonding. Read the CDC disinfection and sterilization guidelines for chemical disinfectants here. U.S. consumers can also buy 100% ethanol without a license at LabAlley.com.

Buy Virus Disinfectant Cleaners That Meet EPA Standards To Protect Yourself, Your Family, Your Employees And Customers

70% antibacterial and antifungal denatured alcohol and ethanol sold online at LabAlley.com are great virucidal disinfectants and hand sanitizers against non-enveloped viruses as well as single-stranded, positive-sense RNA viruses 

Ethanol and isopropyl alcohol are used throughout the world for disinfecting environmental surfaces in health care communities and for hand disinfection and hand rubbing. It has been noted that ethanol has a stronger and broader virucidal activity than propanols such as isopropanol.

Non-enveloped viruses do not have a lipid-bilayer membrane. Non-enveloped viruses reproduce by breaching the membrane of a target host cell to get access to cytoplasm of the cell. A virus encased within a lipid bilayer is called an enveloped virus and a virus that does not have a bilayer is classified as a non-enveloped virus.

Canada's Interim Guide On The Production Of Ethanol For Use In Alcohol-Based Hand Sanitizers
May 8, 2020

On This Page 

This document provides information on the use of ethanol as an ingredient in alcohol-based hand sanitizers sold in Canada. Numerous Canadian entities and industries not currently regulated by Health Canada have expressed interest in providing additional and/or alternate sources of ethanol (also known as anhydrous alcohol, ethyl alcohol, or grain alcohol) for use in the production of hand sanitizers to support the national response to the supply shortage during the pandemic.

To help reduce the risk of infection or spreading infection to others, Health Canada recommends that individuals wash their hands often with soap and water, or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available. Similarly, the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that individuals regularly and thoroughly clean their hands with soap and water, or an alcohol-based hand rub, as part of proper hand hygiene.

On March 27, 2020, Health Canada released the Guide on Health Canada's Interim Expedited Licensing Approach for the Production and Distribution of Alcohol-Based Hand Sanitizers. The purpose of that Guide is to support companies that intend to manufacture, package, label and/or distribute alcohol-based hand sanitizers in response to the current shortage by providing a simplified and expedited pathway to obtaining the required authorizations.

This document provides further guidance on the quality requirements for ethanol to be used in the production of hand sanitizers. It also highlights key formulation aspects and points to additional flexibilities that can be leveraged during this emergency situation.

To protect the health and safety of Canadians, Health Canada remains committed to its mandate while balancing the need for exceptional measures during the pandemic. As such, the quality of ethanol used in manufacturing hand sanitizers must be fit for purpose and meet safety, efficacy and quality requirements.

This interim approach takes into account the current policies and best practices of foreign regulatory partners, including the United States (US) Food and Drug Administration (FDA), as well as the recommendations of the WHO and the US Pharmacopeia (USP).

Acceptable Quality Grades

Ethanol used for the production of hand sanitizers should conform to one of the identity and purity criteria published in any of the following quality standards, with any noted deviations provided in this interim guidance. For details on these quality standards, please refer to the weblinks provided below. Please note that some of these references may be accessed for free, while others require payment for full access:

The USP monograph specifies that ethanol must be 94.9% to 96.0% pure by volume, and provides the following concentration limits for impurities commonly found in ethanol:

  • Methanol: No more than 200 µL/L
  • Acetaldehyde and acetal: No more than 10 µL/L, expressed as acetaldehyde
  • Benzene: No more than 2 µL/L
  • Sum of all other impurities: No more than 300 µL/L

Recommended Formulation

All formulations must meet the safety and efficacy requirements established in Health Canada’s Antiseptic Skin Cleansers (Personal Domestic Use) monograph.

Health Canada recommends the manufacturing of ethanol‑based hand sanitizer as per the WHO formulation. Specifically, the WHO-recommended handrub formulations (2010) provides a recipe for the preparation of a hand sanitizer with a final concentration of 80% v/v ethanol. While Health Canada’s monograph stipulates a range of 60%-80 v/v ethanol, an 80% v/v concentration is recommended for increased efficacy.

Formulation For A 10-Litre Preparation 

Other Acceptable Formulations Include: 

Records

Records must be maintained on how the hand sanitizer is prepared, including details on how the final ethanol dilution in the finished product was derived. The amount of ethanol needed in the formulation should be calculated using the following equation (as set out in the USP guidance):

How To Calculate The Amount Of Ethanol In A Hand Sanitizer Formulation

Non-Medicinal Ingredients (NMIs)

All NMIs added to a hand sanitizer product must be listed in Health Canada’s Natural Health Products Ingredient Database (NHPID), indicated with an acceptable purpose and comply with all listed restrictions (as per the NHPID). Additional information is outlined below on quality requirements for specific NMIs used in ethanol-based hand sanitizers, based on the WHO guidance:

NMI  Quality Requirements
Hydrogen Peroxide The low concentration of Hydrogen peroxide in the finished product (0.125%) is intended to help eliminate contaminating spores in the bulk solutions and recipients and is not an active substance for hand antisepsis.
Glycerol and other humectants or emollients

Glycerol (also known as glycerine or 1,2,3-Propanetriol) is added as a humectant at a final concentration of 1.45%, to increase the acceptability of the product and not to enhance viscosity.

Other humectants or emollients at a similar concentration may be used for skin care, provided that they are affordable, available locally, miscible (mixable) in water and alcohol, non-toxic, and not likely to cause an allergic reaction. Glycerol has been chosen because it is safe and relatively inexpensive. Lowering the percentage of glycerol may be considered to further reduce the stickiness of the handrub.

Use of proper
water
While sterile distilled water is preferred, boiled and cooled tap water may also be used as long as it is free of visible particles.
Addition of other additives It is strongly recommended that no ingredients other than those specified in this document be added to the formulations. All NMIs  (including denaturants) must be listed in the Product Licence application. If additions or substitutions of an NMI are made after the product licence is issued, documentation must be maintained on the safety of the additive and its compatibility with the other ingredients. These documents must be available upon request by Health Canada. Any substitutions should come from approved ingredients in the NHPID. If the NMI that you intend to use is not found in NHPID, you can complete a Natural Health Products Ingredients Database Issue Form and submit to this email to add the ingredient. The full list of ingredients must be provided on the product label.
Denaturants The use of denaturants is recommended to avoid the unintentional ingestion of hand sanitizers (particularly by children), but is not required under this interim approach. The NHPID includes a listing of acceptable denaturants that should be used if applicable in your formulation. Once this interim approach ceases to be in effect, to continue with the manufacture of hand sanitizer products, companies will be required to confirm with Health Canada that denaturants will be used from that point on.
Gelling agents No data are available to assess the suitability of adding gelling agents to WHO-recommended liquid formulations; any additives selected for this purpose must be listed in Health Canada’s NHPID and comply with listed restrictions. The addition of a gelling agent must be included in the list of ingredients on the product label.
Fragrances Adding fragrances, while not prohibited, is not recommended because of the risk of potential allergic reactions. As with other ingredients, a fragrance would be considered an NMI and must be included in the Product Licence application and be listed on the product label.

 

Formula Substitutions

Ingredients adhering to USP (or other acceptable standards, as listed above) should be used as the source of ingredients. However, given that there may currently be shortages of ingredients used to manufacture formulations of alcohol-based hand sanitizers, the following substitutions are acceptable:

  • When components meeting compendial quality standards are not obtainable, components of similar quality – such as those that are chemically pure, analytical reagent grade, or American Chemical Society-certified – may be used.
  • No ingredients should be added to enhance viscosity as they may decrease the effectiveness of the final preparation.

Disinfectant product ingredients, whether registered with the US Environmental Protection Agency or Health Canada, are not suitable as components for manufacturing hand sanitizers as they may not be safe for use on skin (i.e., may cause burns).

Use Of Non-USP Grade Alcohol

As per the Natural Health Products Regulations (NHPR), a Product Licence will not be issued if a product is likely to result in injury to the health of the consumer. Non-USP grade ethanol should be of a level of quality that is fit for human use in the finished hand sanitizer formulation.

For any products containing ethanol with specifications that deviate from the recommended standards, such as higher than permitted level of impurities in the above referenced standards, a risk assessment must be conducted and submitted to Health Canada for review. Each risk assessment will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis to determine if the ethanol is safe for use in hand sanitizer production. In the risk assessment, particular attention should be given to identify and quantify impurities, which are expected to be present (or likely to be present) as a result of manufacturing processes, starting materials, etc. An example of some impurities that would be expected in a non-USP or food grade ethanol product include acetaldehyde, benzene and methanol, though there may be others as well. Documentation including certificates of analysis (CoA) must be kept on record and made available at the request of Health Canada.

Excise Tax Implications

The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) administers the Excise Act, 2001 which governs the federal taxation of several commodities, including spirits, and regulates activities involving the manufacture, possession and distribution of these products. For example, persons who produce and package spirits, persons who use non-duty-paid spirits in the manufacture of non-beverage spirit-based products such as cosmetics or hand sanitizers, and persons who operate warehouses to store non-duty-paid alcohol must possess an excise duty licence issued under the Excise Act, 2001.

Depending on the circumstances, a person may require a spirits licence, a user’s licence and/or a specially denatured alcohol registration in order to legally produce hand sanitizer using non-duty-paid alcohol in Canada. There are a number of ways hand sanitizer can be produced by licensees or registrants without incurring an excise duty liability, for example:

  • A user licensee can produce hand sanitizer in accordance with an approved formulation without the payment of excise duty on the final product.
  • There are also provisions that would allow a specially denatured alcohol registrant to possess and use certain grades of specially denatured alcohol to produce hand sanitizer without the payment of duty.
  • A spirits licensee is authorized under the Excise Act, 2001 to denature spirits according to specified criteria, which are not subject to excise duty.
  • Although it could be cost prohibitive, there is also the option to use duty-paid alcohol to produce hand sanitizer. 

The requirements under the Act will vary depending on the circumstances of each case and the proposed activities to be undertaken.

Obtaining A Licence, Registration And/Or Approved Formulation Under The Excise Act, 2001

A number of spirits licensees, licenced users and brewer licensees (excise licensees) have expressed an interest in using non-duty-paid alcohol to make hand sanitizer. These are existing excise licensees who are seeking to temporarily expand their operations in response to the shortage in supply as a result of the pandemic. In some cases, excise licensees are requesting specially denatured alcohol registrations to allow them to possess and use specially denatured alcohol for this purpose. In other cases, spirits or brewer licensees are requesting users’ licences and approved formulations. The CRA is also receiving enquiries from non-licensees who would like to apply for a specially denatured alcohol registration or user’s licence and approved formulation for the purpose of producing hand sanitizer. In response to the current circumstances, the CRA has implemented a streamlined process to expedite the review and approval of these applications.

Applications for users’ licences and specially denatured alcohol registrations should be submitted to your regional excise duty office using Form L63 Licence and Registration Application Excise Act, 2001. Applications for formulation approval should be submitted using Form Y15D - Request for Formula Approval. Note that a sample is not currently required for excise licensees applying for an approved formulation for the production of hand sanitizer. For questions or further information, please visit this website Excise Duties, Excise Taxes, Fuel Charge and Air Travellers Security Charge, which also includes the contact information for your regional excise duty office. These regional offices are your best source for information on excise taxes.

End Of Interim Approach

This interim approach is in effect immediately, and will be in effect until March 31, 2021 or until a notice is issued by Health Canada to licence holders (whichever is earliest). When the approach expires, production must cease, although existing product stock can be exhausted.

Contact Health Canada

If you have questions in relation to this Guide or the licensing of alcohol-based hand sanitizers, please contact Health Canada's Natural and Non-prescription Health Products Directorate at hc.nnhpd-dpsnso.sc@canada.ca

Information On Hand Sanitizer Ingredients From Wikipedia

Hand sanitizer is a liquid, gel, or foam generally used to decrease infectious agents on the hands. In most settings, hand washing with soap and water is generally preferred. Hand sanitizer is less effective at killing certain kinds of germs, such as norovirus and Clostridium difficile and unlike soap and water, it cannot remove harmful chemicals. People may incorrectly wiped off hand sanitizer before it has dried, and some are less effective because their alcohol concentrations are too low.

In most healthcare settings alcohol-based hand sanitizers are preferable to hand washing with soap and water. Reasons include it being better tolerated and more effective. Hand washing with soap and water; however, should be carried out if contamination can be seen, or following the use of the toilet. The general use of non-alcohol-based hand sanitizers has no recommendations.

Alcohol-based versions typically contain some combination of isopropyl alcohol, ethanol (ethyl alcohol), or n-propanol, with versions containing 60% to 95% alcohol the most effective. Care should be taken as they are flammable. Alcohol-based hand sanitizer works against a wide variety of microorganisms but not spores. Compounds such as glycerol may be added to prevent drying of the skin. Some versions contain fragrances; however, these are discouraged due to the risk of allergic reactions. Non-alcohol based versions typically contain benzalkonium chloride or triclosan; but are less effective than alcohol-based ones. 

Alcohol has been used as an antiseptic at least as early as 1363 with evidence to support its use becoming available in the late 1800s. Alcohol-based hand sanitizer has been commonly used in Europe since at least the 1980s. The alcohol-based version is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines, the safest and most effective medicines needed in a health system. The wholesale cost in the developing world is about US$1.40–3.70 per liter bottle.

Uses 

General Public 

The Clean Hands campaign by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) instructs the public in hand washing. Alcohol-based hand sanitizer is recommended only if soap and water are not available.

When using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer:

  • Apply product to the palm of one hand.
  • Rub hands together.
  • Rub the product over all surfaces of hands and fingers until hands are dry.
  • Do not go near flame or gas burner or any burning object during applying hand sanitizer.
  • The current evidence for the effectiveness of school hand hygiene interventions is of poor quality.

Alcohol-based hand sanitizers may not be effective if the hands are greasy or visibly soiled. In hospitals, the hands of healthcare workers are often contaminated with pathogens, but rarely soiled or greasy. In community settings, on the other hand, grease and soiling is common from activities such as handling food, playing sports, gardening, and being active outdoors. Similarly, contaminants like heavy metals and pesticides (generally found outdoors) cannot be removed by hand sanitizers. Hand sanitizers may also be swallowed by children, especially if brightly-coloured.

Some commercially-available hand sanitizers (and online recipes for homemade rubs) have alcohol concentrations that are too low. This makes them less effective at killing germs. Poorer people in developed countries and people in developing countries may find it harder to get a hand sanitizer with an effective alcohol concentration. Fraudulent labelling of alcohol concentrations has been a problem in Guyana.

Health Care 

Hand sanitizers were first introduced in 1966 in medical settings such as hospitals and healthcare facilities. The product was popularized in the early 1990s.

Alcohol-based hand sanitizer is more convenient compared to hand washing with soap and water in most situations in the healthcare setting. Among healthcare workers, it is generally more effective for hand antisepsis, and better tolerated than soap and water. Hand washing should still be carried out if contamination can be seen or following the use of the toilet.

Hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol or contains a "persistent antiseptic" should be used. Alcohol rubs kill many different kinds of bacteria, including antibiotic resistant bacteria and TB bacteria. They also kill many kinds of viruses, including the flu virus, the common cold virus, and HIV.

90% alcohol rubs are more effective against viruses than most other forms of hand washing. Isopropyl alcohol will kill 99.99 % or more of all non-spore forming bacteria in less than 30 seconds, both in the laboratory and on human skin.

The alcohol in hand sanitizers may not have the 10–15 seconds exposure time required to denature proteins and lyse cells in too low quantities (0.3 ml) or concentrations (below 60%). In environments with high lipids or protein waste (such as food processing), the use of alcohol hand rubs alone may not be sufficient to ensure proper hand hygiene.

For health care settings like hospitals and clinics, optimum alcohol concentration to kill bacteria is 70% to 95%. Products with alcohol concentrations as low as 40% are available in American stores, according to researchers at East Tennessee State University.

Alcohol rub sanitizers kill most bacteria, and fungi, and stop some viruses. Alcohol rub sanitizers containing at least 70% alcohol (mainly ethyl alcohol) kill 99.9% of the bacteria on hands 30 seconds after application and 99.99% to 99.999% in one minute.

For health care, optimal disinfection requires attention to all exposed surfaces such as around the fingernails, between the fingers, on the back of the thumb, and around the wrist. Hand alcohol should be thoroughly rubbed into the hands and on the lower forearm for a duration of at least 30 seconds and then allowed to air dry.

Use of alcohol-based hand gels dries skin less, leaving more moisture in the epidermis, than hand washing with antiseptic/antimicrobial soap and water.

Drawbacks

There are certain situations during which hand washing with soap and water are preferred over hand sanitizer, these include: eliminating bacterial spores of Clostridioides difficile, parasites such as Cryptosporidium, and certain viruses like norovirus depending on the concentration of alcohol in the sanitizer (95% alcohol was seen to be most effective in eliminating most viruses). In addition, if hands are contaminated with fluids or other visible contaminates, hand washing is preferred as well as after using the toilet and if discomfort develops from the residue of alcohol sanitizer use. Furthermore, CDC states hand sanitizers are not effective in removing chemicals such as pesticides.

Safety 

Fire
Alcohol gel can catch fire, producing a translucent blue flame. This is due to the flammable alcohol in the gel. Some hand sanitizer gels may not produce this effect due to a high concentration of water or moisturizing agents. There have been some rare instances where alcohol has been implicated in starting fires in the operating room, including a case where alcohol used as an antiseptic pooled under the surgical drapes in an operating room and caused a fire when a cautery instrument was used. Alcohol gel was not implicated.

To minimize the risk of fire, alcohol rub users are instructed to rub their hands until dry, which indicates that the flammable alcohol has evaporated. Igniting alcohol hand rub while using it is rare, but the need for this is underlined by one case of a health care worker using hand rub, removing a polyester isolation gown, and then touching a metal door while her hands were still wet; static electricity produced an audible spark and ignited the hand gel. Fire departments suggest refills for the alcohol-based hand sanitizers can be stored with cleaning supplies away from heat sources or open flames.

Skin
Research shows that alcohol hand sanitizers do not pose any risk by eliminating beneficial microorganisms that are naturally present on the skin. The body quickly replenishes the beneficial microbes on the hands, often moving them in from just up the arms where there are fewer harmful microorganisms.

However, alcohol may strip the skin of the outer layer of oil, which may have negative effects on barrier function of the skin. A study also shows that disinfecting hands with an antimicrobial detergent results in a greater barrier disruption of skin compared to alcohol solutions, suggesting an increased loss of skin lipids.

Ingestion
In the United States, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) controls antimicrobial handsoaps and sanitizers as over-the-counter drugs (OTC) because they are intended for topical anti-microbial use to prevent disease in humans.

The FDA requires strict labeling which informs consumers on proper use of this OTC drug and dangers to avoid, including warning adults not to ingest, not to use in the eyes, to keep out of the reach of children, and to allow use by children only under adult supervision. According to the American Association of Poison Control Centers, there were nearly 12,000 cases of hand sanitizer ingestion in 2006. If ingested, alcohol-based hand sanitizers can cause alcohol poisoning in small children. However, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control recommends using hand sanitizer with children to promote good hygiene, under supervision, and furthermore recommends parents pack hand sanitizer for their children when traveling, to avoid their contracting disease from dirty hands.

There have been reported incidents of people drinking the gel in prisons and hospitals, where alcohol consumption is not allowed, to become intoxicated leading to its withdrawal from some establishments.

Absorption

On April 30, 2015, the FDA announced that they were requesting more scientific data based on the safety of hand sanitizer. Emerging science suggests that for at least some health care antiseptic active ingredients, systemic exposure (full body exposure as shown by detection of antiseptic ingredients in the blood or urine) is higher than previously thought, and existing data raise potential concerns about the effects of repeated daily human exposure to some antiseptic active ingredients. This would include hand antiseptic products containing alcohol and triclosan.

Surgical Hand Disinfection

Hands must be disinfected before any surgical procedure by hand washing with mild soap and then hand-rubbing with a sanitizer. Surgical disinfection requires a larger dose of the hand-rub and a longer rubbing time than is ordinarily used. It is usually done in two applications according to specific hand-rubbing techniques, EN1499 (hygienic handwash), and EN 1500 (hygienic hand disinfection) to ensure that antiseptic is applied everywhere on the surface of the hand.

Alcohol-Free 

Some hand sanitizer products use agents other than alcohol to kill microorganisms, such as povidone-iodine, benzalkonium chloride or triclosan. The World Health Organization (WHO) and the CDC recommends "persistent" antiseptics for hand sanitizers. Persistent activity is defined as the prolonged or extended antimicrobial activity that prevents or inhibits the proliferation or survival of microorganisms after application of the product. This activity may be demonstrated by sampling a site several minutes or hours after application and demonstrating bacterial antimicrobial effectiveness when compared with a baseline level. This property also has been referred to as "residual activity." Both substantive and nonsubstantive active ingredients can show a persistent effect if they substantially lower the number of bacteria during the wash period.

Laboratory studies have shown lingering benzalkonium chloride may be associated with antibiotic resistance in MRSA. Tolerance to alcohol sanitizers may develop in fecal bacteria. Where alcohol sanitizers utilize 62%, or higher, alcohol by weight, only 0.1 to 0.13% of benzalkonium chloride by weight provides equivalent antimicrobial effectiveness.

Triclosan has been shown to accumulate in biosolids in the environment, one of the top seven organic contaminants in waste water according to the National Toxicology Program Triclosan leads to various problems with natural biological systems, and triclosan, when combined with chlorine e.g. from tap water, produces dioxins, a probable carcinogen in humans. However, 90–98% of triclosan in waste water biodegrades by both photolytic or natural biological processes or is removed due to sorption in waste water treatment plants. Numerous studies show that only very small traces are detectable in the effluent water that reaches rivers.

A series of studies show that photodegradation of triclosan produced 2,4-dichlorophenol and 2,8-dichlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (2,8-DCDD). The 2,4-dichlorophenol itself is known to be biodegradable as well as photodegradable. For DCDD, one of the non-toxic compounds of the dioxin family, a conversion rate of 1% has been reported and estimated half-lives suggest that it is photolabile as well. The formation-decay kinetics of DCDD are also reported by Sanchez-Prado et al. (2006) who claim "transformation of triclosan to toxic dioxins has never been shown and is highly unlikely."

Alcohol-free hand sanitizers may be effective immediately while on the skin, but the solutions themselves can become contaminated because alcohol is an in-solution preservative and without it, the alcohol-free solution itself is susceptible to contamination. However, even alcohol-containing hand sanitizers can become contaminated if the alcohol content is not properly controlled or the sanitizer is grossly contaminated with microorganisms during manufacture. In June 2009, alcohol-free Clarcon Antimicrobial Hand Sanitizer was pulled from the US market by the FDA, which found the product contained gross contamination of extremely high levels of various bacteria, including those which can "cause opportunistic infections of the skin and underlying tissues and could result in medical or surgical attention as well as permanent damage". Gross contamination of any hand sanitizer by bacteria during manufacture will result in the failure of the effectiveness of that sanitizer and possible infection of the treatment site with the contaminating organisms.

Types 

Alcohol-based hand rubs are extensively used in the hospital environment as an alternative to antiseptic soaps. Hand-rubs in the hospital environment have two applications: hygienic hand rubbing and surgical hand disinfection. Alcohol based hand rubs provide a better skin tolerance as compared to antiseptic soap. Hand rubs also prove to have more effective microbiological properties as compared to antiseptic soaps.

The same ingredients used in over-the-counter hand-rubs are also used in hospital hand-rubs: alcohols such ethanol and isopropanol, sometimes combined with quaternary ammonium cations (quats) such as benzalkonium chloride. Quats are added at levels up to 200 parts per million to increase antimicrobial effectiveness. Although allergy to alcohol-only rubs is rare, fragrances, preservatives and quats can cause contact allergies. These other ingredients do not evaporate like alcohol and accumulate leaving a "sticky" residue until they are removed with soap and water.

The most common brands of alcohol hand rubs include Aniosgel, Avant, Sterillium, Desderman and Allsept S. All hospital hand rubs must conform to certain regulations like EN 12054 for hygienic treatment and surgical disinfection by hand-rubbing. Products with a claim of "99.99% reduction" or 4-log reduction are ineffective in hospital environment, since the reduction must be more than "99.99%".

The hand sanitizer dosing systems for hospitals are designed to deliver a measured amount of the product for staff. They are dosing pumps screwed onto a bottle or are specially designed dispensers with refill bottles. Dispensers for surgical hand disinfection are usually equipped with elbow controlled mechanism or infrared sensors to avoid any contact with the pump.

Production 

In 2010 the World Health Organization produced a guide for manufacturing hand sanitizer, which received renewed interest because of shortages of hand sanitizer in the wake of the pandemic. Dozens of liquor and perfume manufactures switched their manufacturing facilities from their normal product to hand sanitizer. In order to keep up with the demand, local distilleries started using their alcohol to make hand sanitizer. Distilleries producing hand sanitizer originally existed in a legal grey area in the United States, until the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau declared that distilleries could produce their sanitizer without authorization.

There are cautions against making your own hand sanitizer. Some widely-circulated home recipes are ineffective or even poisonous.

Composition 

World Health OrganizationThe has published a guide to producing large quantities of hand sanitizer from chemicals available in developing countries, where commercial hand sanitizer may not be available:

FORMULATION 1  10-L prep. Active ingredient (v/v) FORMULATION 2 10-L prep. Active ingredient (v/v)
Distilled water added to 10000 mL 18.425% Distilled water added to 10000 mL 23.425%
Ethanol 96% 8333 mL 80% Isopropyl alcohol 99.8% 7515 mL 75%
Glycerol 98% 145 mL 1.45% Glycerol 98% 145 mL 1.45%
Hydrogen peroxide 3% 417 mL 0.125% Hydrogen peroxide 3% 417 mL 0.125%

 

The WHO formulation are less viscous than commercial sanitizer gel, so like alcohol, they are a greater fire hazard.

Consumer alcohol-based hand sanitizers, and health care "hand alcohol" or "alcohol hand antiseptic agents" exist in liquid, foam, and easy-flowing gel formulations. Products with 60% to 95% alcohol by volume are effective antiseptics. Lower or higher concentrations are less effective; most products contain between 60% and 80% alcohol.

In addition to alcohol (ethanol, isopropanol or n-Propanol), hand sanitizers also contain the following:

Hydrogen peroxide may be added to inactivate spores within bottle of hand sanitizer but does not play a role when the hand sanitizer is used.

Buy Vrus Disinfectants Online At LabAlley.com For Infection Control In U.S. Households And Community Facilities

The 70% ethyl alcohol sold by LabAlley.com is a better virucide than the 70% isopropyl alcohol and is quickly antimicrobial against viruses, bacteria and fungi on hard surfaces. 

Isopropanol (isopropyl alcohol ) and ethyl alcohol in aqueous solutions between 60% and 90% alcohol with 10% to 40% purified water, kill bacteria and viruses by denaturing their proteins and dissolving their lipid membranes. When a bacterial cell is exposed to a solution of ethyl alcohol or isopropyl alcohol, the amphiphile alcohol molecules bond with the molecules of the bacteria's cell membrane, making it more soluble in water. This reaction causes the cell membrane to lose its structural integrity and then fall apart.

Buy Ethyl Alcohol And Isopropyl Alcohol At LabAlley.com To Kill viruses And Be Sure To Also Use Soap And Water

Ethyl alcohol, isopropyl alcohol and soap all kill the viruses. Soap contains fat-like substances known as amphiphiles, which are structurally very similar to lipids in virus membranes. Soap loosens the bond between viruses and skin which helps decrease the spread of viruses. Soap also loosens the Velcro-like interactions that hold the proteins, lipids and RNA in the virus together. Alcohol-based disinfectant products sold at LabAlley.com that contain a high-percentage alcohol solution (normally 70% ethanol and 70% isopropyl alcohol) kill viruses in the same way. Additionally, the mechanical action of hand washing with soap loosens viruses and bacteria from the skin.

The CDC recommends using an alcohol-based hand rub (ABHR) with greater than 60% ethanol or 70% isopropyl alcohol in healthcare environments. Unless hands are visibly soiled, an ABHR is recommended over soap and water in clinical situations because of evidence of better compliance compared to soap and water. Hand rubs are normally less irritating to hands and are effective in the absence of a sink.  Hands should be washed with soap and water for at least 20 seconds when visibly soiled, before eating, and after using the restroom. Learn more about hand hygiene in healthcare facilities here.

Buy Alcohol-Based Disinfectants At LabAlley.com To Compound Hand Sanitizers And To Keep Viruses From Replicating

Alcohol-based hand sanitizer compounders protect children by using denatured ethanol or isopropyl alcohol. The FDA provides guidance on the production of alcohol-based hand sanitizer to help boost supply and protect public health. Viruses intricately interact with and modulate cellular membranes at several stages of their replication, but much less is known about the role of viral lipids compared to proteins and nucleic acids.

All animal viruses have to cross membranes for cell entry and exit, which occurs by membrane fusion (in enveloped viruses), by transient local disruption of membrane integrity, or by cell lysis. The CDC and the FDA are helping to keep children safe by recommending that compounders use denatured alcohol and isopropyl alcohol to formulate and manufacture hand sanitizers and virus disinfectants. 

Viruses are obligatory intracellular parasites that are simple in structure and composition, but engage in multiple and complex interactions with their host. Virus replication occurs exclusively inside the respective host cell. Accordingly, viruses have to cross the host cell boundary at least twice during their replication cycle, for entry and exit. Because these viral membranes are derived from the host, they may contain a complement of membrane-bound host cell proteins.

Because denatured alcohol (ethanol/ethyl alcohol) tastes awful and it smells bad, this hand sanitizer ingredient discourages young children from eating virus disinfectants. Denaturants in alcohol make it unfit for human consumption.

Buy 70% Denatured Alcohol And 70% Isopropyl Alcohol To Combat Viruses

Both 70% denatured ethanol (140 proof) and 70% isopropyl alcohol are excellent disinfectants for surface-cleaning uses. 70% isopropyl alcohol is frequently used as an antiseptic in hospitals. Because of an increased demand for alcohol-based hand sanitizers during the virus pandemic, many U.S. healthcare facilities are augmenting their cleaning supplies by ordering ethyl alcohol (70%) and 70% isopropyl alcohol at LabAlley.com. In April of 2020, tons of 70% alcohol were ordered online at LabAlley.com for large-scale disinfection efforts against viruses and for household cleaningsanitation and sterilization purposes in the U.S.

Buy antimicrobial disinfectants such as ethanol 70%, sodium hypochlorite and isopropanol to control Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections in homes and healthcare settings. Buy ingredients for safe recipes for DIY homemade hand sanitizers hereBuy virus disinfectants here. Buy hospital grade disinfectants online here.  

Buy The Best Virus Disinfectants, Antimicrobial Sprays, Antibacterial Wipes And Household Cleaning Supplies Online

 

Shop Online At Lab Alley.com

Buy Safe Ingredients And Chemicals For DIY Homemade Hand Sanitizers, Cosmetics, Makeup, Lotions, Soaps, Household Cleaning Products, Laboratory Sterilization, Food And Beverage Processing, Skin Care Formulations, Hospital Disinfectants, Personal Care Products, Botanical And Essential Oils, Botanical Extracts, Pharmaceutical Drugs, Herbal Tinctures, Kid Safe Pools, Pest Control Products, Lawn Care Products, Chemistry Labs, Natural Health Supplements And Vitamins, Virus Disinfection Products, Perfumes, Hospital Grade Detergents, Disinfecting Wipes And Disinfectant Sprays At LabAlley.com

Buy bulk natural ingredients and antiviral chemicals, bulk food grade chemicals and organic raw materials for safe recipes for DIY homemade hand sanitizers here. Buy antiviral hand sanitizer ingredients, antiviral disinfectants, antiviral products and antiviral chemical compounds here. Buy antiviral hospital grade disinfectants, pharmaceutical grade substances, hand sanitizers, sterilization sprays, wipes, cleaners and detergents hereViruses can be eliminated with soap, bleach, alcohol, food or UV light.

Buy lab supplies, laboratory glassware, chemical crystals and powders, oils, gels, spray bottles and stock chemical solutions to make Virus disinfectants here. You can also buy other compounds and additives for safe hand sanitizer recipes, cosmetics and personal care products at LabAlley.com. Find out how chemicals are made, sold, priced, bought, shipped and used in the United States here.

Popular additives for skin care products purchased online in bulk at wholesale prices at LabAlley.com include food grade ethanol, 100% alcohol, 95% alcohol, 70% alcohol, 99% isopropyl alcohol, 91% isopropyl alcohol, 70% isopropyl alcohol, 3% hydrogen peroxide, 6% hydrogen peroxidefood grade hydrogen peroxide, food grade (FCC) vegetable glycerin, Food Grade (FCC) glycerol, solvents, aqueous acids and acids in crystalline powder form.

Shop for popular ingredients used to formulate DIY homemade personal care products such as high purity water, citric acid, menthol crystalsnatural peppermint oil, Polysorbate 80, phenol, trichloroacetic acid  (TCC), denatured alcoholn-Propanol, MCT (Coconut Oil), sodium hypochloritesalicylic acid, fumaric acidsodium hydroxide, triethanolaminebenzalkonium chloridetriethylene glycolpropylene glycol, ammonium hydroxide, olive oil at LabAlley.com. Buy antiviral hand sanitizer ingredients, antiviral disinfectants, antiviral products and antiviral chemical compounds here. Buy antiviral hospital grade disinfectants, pharmaceutical grade substances, hand sanitizers, sterilization sprays, wipes, cleaners and detergents here. Buy lab supplies, chemical powders, oils, gels, spray bottles and chemical solutions to make Virus disinfectants here at LabAlley.com.

Buy Chemicals For Virus Infection Protection

The CDC always recommends everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases. Use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol. Buy chemicals to make hand sanitizers at LabAlley.com here.

Shop Online For The Best Rated Virus Disinfectants And Virus Killers To Prevent The Spread Of Infectious Diseases At LabAlley.com
04/18/20

The USP Compounding Expert Committee (CMP EC) provides recommendations for compounding alcohol-based hand sanitizers for use during shortages associated with the pandemic. Download the USP recommendations here (PDF)

Does Hydrogen Peroxide Kill Viruses?

Yes, in all probability, viruses can be efficiently inactivated with surface disinfection procedures that use hydrogen peroxide ordered at LabAlley.com.

3% hydrogen peroxide purchased online at LabAlley.com is used as a spray sanitizer to kill rhinovirus on surfaces.  

Hydrogen peroxide is active against a wide range of microorganisms, including bacteria, yeasts, fungi, viruses, and spores. The CDC provides information on the effectiveness of hydrogen peroxide solutions against viruses. The hydrogen peroxide solutions listed on the CDC website include 0.5% accelerated hydrogen peroxide, 3% concentration, 6% hydrogen peroxide, 10% hydrogen peroxide solution, 7% stabilized hydrogen peroxide and 13.4% hydrogen peroxide.

Antimicrobial Products That Are Effective Against Norovirus (Norwalk-Like Virus)
April 8, 2020

For pesticide registration information, review this list from the EPA, "List G: EPA’s Registered Antimicrobial Products Effective Against Norovirus (Norwalk-Like Virus)". 

Notes About This List

  • All EPA-registered pesticides must have an EPA registration number, which consists of a company number and a product number (e.g., 123-45). Alternative brand names have the same EPA registration number as the primary product.
  • When purchasing a product for use against a specific pathogen, check the EPA Reg. No. versus the products included on this list.
  • In addition to primary products, distributors may also sell products with formulations and efficacy identical to the primary products. Distributor products frequently use different brand names, but you can identify them by their three-part EPA registration number (e.g., 123-45-678, which represents a distributor product identical to the product example listed above, EPA Reg. No. 123-45).
  • If you would like to review the product label information for any of these products, please visit the EPA product label system.
  • Information about listed products is current as of the date on this list.
  • Inclusion on this list does not constitute an endorsement by EPA.

View more information about EPA lists of registered antimicrobial products here. You may need a PDF reader to view some of the files on this page. See EPA’s About PDF page to learn more. 

  • Download List G: EPA’s Registered Antimicrobial Products Effective Against Norovirus (PDF)(6 pp, 130 K, March 4, 2020)
  • Contact the EPA about pesticide labels, to ask a question, provide feedback, or report a problem. 

About The EPA Pesticide Product and Label System

The Pesticide Product and Label System (PPLS) provides a collection of pesticide product labels (Adobe PDF format) that have been accepted by EPA under Section 3 of the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA). New labels were added to PPLS on April 08, 2020.

  • Search EPA Registration, Distributor Product, or Special Local Need Number Here
  • The EPA Registration Number (EPA Reg. No.) appears on all registered pesticides sold in the United States. It is usually found on the back panel of the label along with the detailed instructions for use.
  • Enter the company number (the first set of digits before the dash) to see all products marketed by that company or the entire number (including the dash) to view the label for a particular product.
  • To search by Special Local Need Number, please enter two-letter state abbreviations with or without 6 digit number (i.e. OH123456).
  • Search Buy Product or Alternative Brand Name: Enter the name of the product. As you type, options will be presented to you. Keep in mind that product names may vary, so if you don’t find the product you are looking for, try the EPA Registration Number Search.
  • Search By Company Name: Enter the name of the company. Some companies may have several divisions that manufacture and market pesticides products. You can select among these divisions using the drop-down list or choose the root of the company name (e.g., "Bayer" or "3M") to see products associated with all of the divisions.
  • Search By Company Number: Enter the company number. Please use digit without dash.
  • Search By Chemical Name (Active Ingredient): Enter the name of the chemical (Active Ingredients only) you are interested in. Because there are many naming conventions for chemicals, you can enter the common chemical name of the chemical or other variants, including scientific names or partial names. This search function will help guide you to products that contain that active ingredient.
  • Search By CAS Number Or PC Code: Enter the CAS Number or PC Code you are interested in. You may use the % wild card before and/or after your entry to enter a partial value.

About Pesticide Labels

Regulation Of Pesticide Labels

Information On Pesticide Product Label Topics

Get Help With Pesticide Label Issues

 

Types of Disinfectants With Examples | Microbiology with Sumi 

The "Microbiology With Suma" YouTube channel cover various topics related to several branches of microbiology including virology

 

Guide to Local Production: WHO-recommended Handrub Formulations

This Guide to Local Production of WHO-recommended Handrub Formulations is separated into two discrete but interrelated sections. Part A provides a practical guide for use at the pharmacy bench during the actual preparation of the formulation. Users may want to display the material on the wall of the production unit. Part B summarizes some essential background technical information and is taken from WHO Guidelines on Hand Hygiene in Health Care (2009). Within Part B the user has access to important safety and cost information and supplementary material relating to dispensers and distribution. Read more here.

Chemical Safety Facts

The American Chemistry Council developed and maintains a website, ChemicalSafetyFacts.org, which provides consumer-friendly information about some of the chemicals that are essential to the products that people use every day.

Safer Chemicals, Healthy Families

This national effort to protect families from toxic chemicals. The organization works to promote strong chemical policies in the U.S. The group works with retailers to phase out hazardous chemicals. The Kid Safe advocates that contribute to the cause, educate the public about ways to protect American families from toxic chemicals. Learn how to keep babies safe from toxic chemicals here.

Environmental Working Group

Americans deserve a strong federal law that ensures that the chemicals they encounter are as safe as possible. When it comes to chemicals, how safe is “safe”? The Environmental Working Group empowers people to live healthier lives in a healthier environment. Get the facts on Kid Safe Chemicals here.

Vermont Children's Safe Products Act

Vermont prioritizes protecting public health and the environment. The state requires manufacturers who use chemicals that are classified 'Chemicals of High Concern to Children', must disclose information about these chemicals to the Health Department.

'Kid Safe Chemical' Definition And Meaning

In 2020, 'Kid Safe Chemicals' in the U.S. reduce the exposure of children to toxic compounds and substances. The potential benefit of using a 'Kid Safe Chemical' outweighs the risk of harm. 'Kid Safe Chemicals' should prevent disease instead of causing it.

However, the popular consumer and legislative term 'Kid Safe Chemicals', is more of an expression of medical ethics than a nationally regulated standard. The loosely used phrase, 'Kid Safe Chemicals', describes a concept similar to the "first, do no harm” idea attributed to the ancient Greek physician Hippocrates in the historical physician's pledge called the Hippocratic Oath. 'Kid Safe Chemicals' "abstain from all intentional wrong-doing and harm."

Any chemical, substance or compound in fluid form, solid form or a gaseous state, which has the potential to injure a child is not considered to be a 'Kid Safe Chemical' and is referred to as a dangerous or hazardous chemical. 'Kid Safe Chemicals' are not toxic when exposure or ingestion is in normal amounts.

Information On Green Chemistry From Wikipedia

Green chemistry, also called sustainable chemistry, is an area of chemistry and chemical engineering focused on the designing of products and processes that minimize or eliminate the use and generation of hazardous substances. While environmental chemistry focuses on the effects of polluting chemicals on nature, green chemistry focuses on the environmental impact of chemistry, including reducing consumption of nonrenewable resources and technological approaches for preventing pollution. Read more here

Levels And Dosage Of Chemicals Determine Toxicity

It is important to know a chemical substance's toxic levels before your children are exposed (either accidentally or purposely) to the compound. Some chemicals are extremely toxic, while others are almost completely benign. 

For example, Hydrofluoric Acid (HF) is a very dangerous acid and inhaling or ingesting even a small amount of hydrofluoric acid is usually lethal. On the flip side, if a child swallowed a small amount of household (3%) hydrogen peroxide, this is not terribly not dangerous. 

An example of a kid safe chemical purchased online at LabAlley.com is Citric Acid. The EPA considers Citric Acid to be a "safer ingredient" to use to make cosmetic products and personal care products. It is a flavor ingredient that is frequently used to make candy and juices for children. Citric Acid is generally safe to use as a food additive.According to the FDA,  citric acid is generally regarded as safe (GRAS) when used in normal amounts.

Kid Safe Chemicals are broadly defined as chemicals that will not likely harm a child if a child consumes a normal amount or is exposed to a typical dosage. Water is a good example of a kid safe chemical. Even though children can experience 'water intoxication' if they engage in a water drinking content, in typical situations, children don't normally consume so much water that they are poisoned. Read more about chemical safety here.

Kid Safe Chemicals In Stock At LabAlley.com

Information On Toxicity And Dose-Dependent Effects From Wikipedia

Toxicity is the degree to which a chemical substance or a particular mixture of substances can damage an organism. Toxicity can refer to the effect on a whole organism, such as an animal, bacterium, or plant, as well as the effect on a substructure of the organism, such as a cell (cytotoxicity) or an organ such as the liver (hepatotoxicity). By extension, the word may be metaphorically used to describe toxic effects on larger and more complex groups, such as the family unit or society at large. Sometimes the word is more or less synonymous with poisoning in everyday usage.

A central concept of toxicology is that the effects of a toxicant are dose-dependent; even water can lead to water intoxication when taken in too high a dose, whereas for even a very toxic substance such as snake venom there is a dose below which there is no detectable toxic effect. Considering the limitations of this dose-response concept, a novel Drug Toxicity Index (DTI) has been proposed recently. DTI redefines drug toxicity, identifies hepatotoxic drugs, gives mechanistic insights, predicts clinical outcomes and has potential as a screening tool. Toxicity is species-specific, making cross-species analysis problematic. Newer paradigms and metrics are evolving to bypass animal testing, while maintaining the concept of toxicity endpoints. Read more here.

Chemical Industry Health And Safety Initiative 

Learn about Responsible Care® and U.S. chemical industry's desire to improve healthsafety and environmental performance here. Review lists of common industrial chemicals and household chemicals available in the U.S., here.  

Buy Safer Chemicals & Sanitation Ingredients For Swimming Pools And Hot Tubs In The US

Kid Safe And Pet Safe Pool Chemicals For Sale Online

Buy safer food grade chemicals and natural sanitation ingredients for cleaning swimming pools and hot tubs in the U.S. Make your own pool chemicals with natural ingredients ordered online at LabAlley.com. There are many natural ways to keep pool water clean. If you want to buy Kid Safe pool chemicals, LabAlley.com is the place.

Buy Food Grade Hydrogen Peroxide For Swimming Pools

Buy 1 gallon of Food Grade Hydrogen Peroxide for $60 to "shock your pool". Diluted food grade hydrogen peroxide is kid safe and pet safe alternative to chlorine that will eliminate bacteria and algae in the swimming pool water. Food grade hydrogen peroxide does not contain toxic stabilizers.

Buy Sodium Thiosulfate For Swimming Pools

You can also use food grade hydrogen to lower chlorine levels in pool. You can also buy sodium thiosulfate at LabAlley.com to treat residential pools and public pools and lower chlorine levels.

Use Kid Safe Household Ingredients To Clean Your Pool

Use safe household chemical ingredients, such as citric acid, to clean your pool. Buy citric acid to create your own 'DIY' pool acid wash, here. This is a safe mixture to clean plastic pool parts, fiberglass, concrete, acrylic parts and pool surfaces.

Buy environmentally friendly, non-toxic, and biodegradable cleaners. Kid Safe and Pet Safe pool chemicals are for sale online at LabAlley.com and are shipped to you by FedEx in the U.S.

Use Natural Ingredients And Safer Chemicals To Maintain A Kid Safe Pool

How To Buy Kid Safe Pool Chemicals And Pet Safe Natural Cleaning Products To Clean Pools And Hot Tubs 

If you have questions about your options and choices for ordering safer and healthier pool chemicals online here at LabAlley.com or if you would like to place an order, call 512-668-9918 or email customerservice@laballey.com to talk with a Pool Chemical Safety Specialist. If you can not find the chemical or ingredient you are looking for, contact us and we may be able to special order it for you.

If Safety Matters, Buy Natural Compounds To Clean Your Pool Or Hot Tub

Buy Natural And Kid Safe Chemicals For Pools And Hot Tubs At LabAlley.com

List Of Organic Cosmetic Ingredients And Raw Materials For Skin Care Products

Buy Kid Safe Chemical Ingredients For Cosmetics And Skin Care Products

Buy safer ingredients and raw materials for making cosmetics, skin care products, creams and personal care products online here. LabAlley.com sells a wide variety of safe ingredients and raw materials for skin care products that relieve skin conditions, support skin integrity and enhance its appearance. Buy the safest solvents for plant, oil, botanical and herbal extraction and processing here

Wholesome substances and invigorating compounds ordered at LabAlley.com in bulk are used to make skin care and cosmetic products that cleanse and beautify. Cosmetic makers and personal care product manufacturers order natural products and food grade chemical compounds at LabAlley.com to make substances and products that are applied to the body and face. These healthy products alter and enhance the fragrance, appearance and texture of the body and face. One of the most popular products ordered in bulk is USDA Certified Organic Coconut Oil sold in 5 gallon pails.

Ingredients in today's skin care products include citric acid, alpha-hydroxy acids, beta hydroxy acids, lactic acid, hydroquinone, retinol, clay, kojic acid, oils, salicylic acid, copper peptide and others. Some of the of common skin care ingredients, cosmetic ingredients, raw materials and personal care product ingredients sold online at LabAlley.com are listed below. Buy safer cosmetic and skin care ingredients here.

Buy Healthy Ingredients And Safe Chemical Substances In The US

If you have questions regarding the personal safety and health ramifications of the chemical substancescosmetic ingredients, science chemicals, bulk chemicals, food additives, lab chemicals, research chemicalsnatural pool chemicalswholesale chemicalslawn chemicals or janitorial cleaning products you want to buy, call 512-668-9918 or email customerservice@LabAlley.com. If you can not find the chemical or ingredient you are looking for, contact us and we may be able to special order it for you. 

U.S. Chemical Ingredients, Shipping Information, Payment Options, Bulk Prices, Wholesale Orders And Discounts

Examples Of Chemicals For Sale In The US In 2019

Low Priced Lab Chemicals, Raw Materials, Food Grade Cosmetic Ingredients And Organic Household Chemicals For Sale

Best Selling Chemical Ingredients In Stock | Current U.S. Chemical Ingredient Prices (U.S. Dollars, 04/07/20)

Buy Safer Organic Ingredients And Chemicals For Household, School Chemistry, Pool, Cosmetic And Laboratory Use In The US In 2020

High Purity, Organic, Natural, Green, Beneficial, Benign And Food Grade Chemicals And Cleaning Products For Sale Online

Buy Safe Raw Materials To Make Your Own DIY Fertilizer

Buy high quality raw materials for homemade organic lawn fertilizers. Buy safe natural lawn chemicals and restorative compounds for lawn care and yard maintenance. Order high purity chemical ingredients for DIY fertilizers at LabAlley.com.

Buy the chemical ingredients to make your own lawn fertilizer. Modern chemical fertilizers use ingredients such as potassium, nitrogen and phosphorus that provide additional plant nutrients. Other fertilizer ingredients are calcium, sulfur and magnesium.

You can buy ammonium nitrate at LabAlley.com to make your own lawn fertilizer to add nitrogen to soil. You can buy Magnesium sulfate (Epsom Salt) to make an effective homemade lawn fertilizer. 

Use Epsom salt, ammonium nitrate, water and some vegetable scraps as ingredients to make liquid fertilizer at home. You can buy potassium nitrate powder at LabAlley.com to make your own potassium fertilizer. Potassium nitrate is used in fertilizers as a source of nitrogen and potassium – two of the macronutrients for plants.

Buy Safer Chemicals, Untainted Chemicals And Innocuous Chemicals For Pest And Insect Control

Buy Safer Compounds, Kid Safe Chemicals, Eco-Friendly Substances, Wholesome Chemicals And Natural Cleaning Products For Maintaining Your House 

Buy Safer Chemicals, Invigorating Powders And Food Grade Substances For Hygiene, Home Made Cosmetics And Personal Care

Buy Safer Chemicals, Food Grade (FCC) Additives And Wholesome Chemicals For Food Ingredients, Cooking And Food Coloring

Get more information on safe food ingredients here.

Buy Approved Chemicals And Ingredients At LabAlley.com

Science-Based Information On Ingredients And Chemicals In Cosmetics, Personal Care Products, Foods And Beverages

Chemicals and chemical ingredients are the foundation of our lives. Americans trust that U.S. chemical suppliers like Lab Alley put consumer health at the forefront. Although federal guidelines help consumers buy safe lab chemical ingredients, order safe cosmetic ingredients, purchase healthy food and beverage ingredients, and make safe personal care products, questions remain about ingredient safety.

Get a better understanding of chemical ingredient safety and toxicity here. To improve your ability to make informed decisions about the food ingredients, cosmetic ingredients and chemical ingredients you order at LabAlley.com, visit the The Center for Research on Ingredient Safety at Michigan State University (CRIS) website. Learn about hair dye chemical ingredients, natural and artificial flavor ingredients, food ingredientscosmetic ingredients and humectants, cosmetic preservatives and Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) ingredients.

Chemical Ingredients 101

Buy Safer Chemicals And Sanitary Chemicals For Hot Tubs, Cleaning And Closing Pools

Buy Safer Chemicals And Benign Chemicals For Cleaning Appliances, Equipment, Machines And Parts

Safer Chemicals For Healthy Families

Conscientious online chemical retailers like Lab Alley take responsibility to ensure that customers can make safer choices when purchasing acids, solvents and household cleaning chemicals online. We applaud campaigns in the United States, such as the Mind The Store campaign, that are encouraging U.S. retailers and chemical supply companies to develop safer chemical product lines, sales and marketing policies. 

Safer Chemicals, Healthy Families is a coalition of activist groups and for-profit companies that are pushing Congress to pass costly legislation that many experts believe would lead to the over-regulation of many everyday products. Get the facts about chemicals that are linked to serious environmental and health problems. Get involved with this national effort underway all across America to protect families from toxic chemicals. Visit the Facebook home Of "Safer Chemicals, Healthy Families" here.

Online shopping websites such as Amazon and eBay are coming under scrutiny because of the chemicals they sell. In 2018, Amazon announced a new policy to restrict toxic chemicals. Online chemicals retailers, such as LabAlley.com are making concerted efforts to encourage the sale of safer chemicals such as citric acidorganic food grade alcohol and organic food grade oils.  In 2018, Amazon published its first-ever restricted substances list (RSL). The new RSL lists substances that the company seeks to avoid in its Amazon-owned private-brand baby, household cleaning, personal care and beauty products in the U.S. To read the EPA's "Safer Chemical Ingredients List", click here. To review a non-hazardous chemicals list, click here.  

MADE SAFE, is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, that has provided America’s first comprehensive human health-focused certification for nontoxic products across store aisles, from baby to personal care to household and beyond. To review the MADE SAFE hazard list of chemicals, materials and ingredients, click here.

Managing Chemical Safety in the Workplace

Chemicals are an important part of nearly every workplace, from specialized industrial chemicals to everyday cleaning products. Ensuring the safe and healthy use of workplace chemicals has been a focus of The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) research since the Institute began in 1970. NIOSH research related to chemicals includes toxicity studies, occupational epidemiology, studies of how to measure chemicals in the work environment, studies of engineering controls and personal protective equipment, risk assessment, Health Hazard Evaluations (HHEs), and communication tools for understanding and managing chemicals safely at work. The Institute has also published seminal works and policy documents related to chemical management essential to safe and healthy work environments.

The Environmental Working Group Is Contributing 

The EWG is an American activist group that specializes in research and advocacy in the areas of agricultural subsidies, toxic chemicals, drinking water pollutants, and corporate accountability. The EWG is a nonprofit organization.

Passing Laws To Keep Kids Safe From Toxic Chemicals

An encouraging legislative landmark was achieved in 2016 when the Lautenberg Chemical Safety Act was signed into law in the USA.  This law overhauled the highly ineffective Toxic Substances Control Act of 1976 in order to  protect not only children but every American, from untested or toxic chemicals used in everyday life. 

Buy FCC (Food Chemicals Codex) And Food Grade Chemicals

The Food Chemicals Codex (FCC) is a compendium of internationally recognized standards for the identity, purity, and quality of food ingredients. Buy FCC and Food Grade chemicals online from LabAlley.com here. Food Grade Chemicals purchased from LabAlley.com are used as food additives, for personal care products and household cleaning products. FCC standards are used to characterize safe ingredients used in food.

A wide variety of food grade chemicals are for sale at LabAlley.com including Food Grade MCT OilFood Grade Ethanol (200 proof alcohol), Food Grade Hydrogen Peroxide, Food Grade Xanthan Gum, Food Grade Acetic Acid in bulk 55 gallon drums and Food Grade Sodium Hydroxide.

The Food Chemicals Codex (FCC) reference materials, located here, will help you verify the identity, quality, and purity of the chemicals and food ingredients you order from LabAlley.com. For more information on public food standards for food and beverage ingredients, click here

USDA Certified Organic MCT Oil And Food Grade MCT Oil For Sale In Bulk At LabAlley.com

USDA Certified Organic MCT Oil sold by LabAlley.com is manufactured with approved coconut oil that has not been genetically engineered. Organic MCT Oil manufacturing processes and operations are overseen by a USDA National Organic certifying agents. Get information on how MCT Oil is labeled as organic here

USDA Certified Organic MCT Oil purchased online at Laballey.com/collections/mct-oil is produced by agricultural operations and processes that conserve biodiversity and protect natural resources. Standards for labeling MCT Oil as "organic" are found in the Organic Food Production Act, USDA organic regulations and the National Organic Program Handbook.

Sources for commercial extraction of MCTs include palm kernel oil and coconut oil. USDA Certified Organic MCT Oil sold by LabAlley.com is made from fractionated coconut oil. Capsules, edibles and tinctures made from medicinal plants, botanicals and herbal extracts are frequently made with USDA Certified Organic MCT Oil that is purchased online at at Laballey.com/collections/mct-oil

Organic MCT Oil and Food Grade MCT Oil contain capric and caprylic fatty acids, which help with the absorption of extracts obtained from medicinal plants. Organic MCT oil is used extensively in the United States as a carrier oil for plant supplements, essential oil blends, medicinal plant extracts, essential oils and organic whole plant botanicals. Certified Organic MCT (Coconut) Oil purchased from Lab Alley is used to make cosmetic products, personal care products, foods and botanical oil infusions. 

Organic MCT Oil and Food Grade MCT Oil from Lab Alley is a good biologically inert source of energy that the human body can metabolize easily. Botanical extract makers in the U.S. that make herbal products order Organic MCT Oil and Food Grade MCT Oil at Laballey.com/collections/mct-oil. Herbal extract are often made by using a solvent such as Food Grade Ethanol to extract components of a plant.

Buy Green Chemicals And Green Solvents Whenever Possible

To prevent and reduce the amount of toxic chemicals used in the USA, LabAlley.com promotes the use of green chemicals in American households and laboratories. Green chemicals, non-toxic cleaning products, natural cleaning products, environmentally safe chemicals, sustainable chemicals, and eco-friendly commercial cleaning products are ordered online from LabAlley.com for the following uses.

Green Chemistry

Green chemistry, also called sustainable chemistry, focuses on products that minimize the use of hazardous substances. Green chemistry is the the utilization of a set of principles that reduces or eliminates the use or generation of hazardous substances in the design, manufacture and application of chemical products. Sustainable chemistry is used to develop safer computer chips, medicine, biodegradable plastics and paints. Traditional solvents are frequently toxic. 

Green solvents, such as Ethyl Lactate, are derived from renewable resources such as corn. Ethyl lactate is the ester of lactic acidLactic acid is an organic acid produced from natural sources. 

The EPA and the ACS Green Chemistry Institute promote research and education in pollution prevention and the reduction of toxins. Learn about green chemistry at the ACS Green Chemistry Institute. 

Information On Chemical Substances From Wikipedia

A chemical substance is a form of matter having constant chemical composition and characteristic properties. Chemical substances can be simple substances, chemical compounds, or alloys. Chemical substances are often called 'pure' to set them apart from mixtures. A common example of a chemical substance is pure water; it has the same properties and the same ratio of hydrogen to oxygen whether it is isolated from a river or made in a laboratory. Other chemical substances commonly encountered in pure form are diamond (carbon), gold, table salt (sodium chloride) and refined sugar (sucrose). However, in practice, no substance is entirely pure, and chemical purity is specified according to the intended use of the chemical. Chemical substances exist as solids, liquids, gases, or plasma, and may change between these phases of matter with changes in temperature or pressure. Chemical substances may be combined or converted to others by means of chemical reactions. Forms of energy, such as light and heat, are not matter, and are thus not "substances" in this regard.

Chemicals Functions

Lab Alley sells safe and high purity chemicals that are used in the United States for the following laboratory, manufacturing or household functions.

  • Antimicrobial Actives
  • Chelating Agents
  • Colorants
  • Defoamers
  • Emollients
  • Enzymes and Enzyme Stabilizers
  • Fragrances
  • Oxidants and Oxidant Stabilizers
  • Polymers
  • Preservatives and Antioxidants
  • Processing Aids and Additives
  • Skin Conditioning Agents
  • Solvents
  • Specialized Industrial Chemicals
  • Surfactants

 How To Shop For Kid Safe Chemicals Online

Common Uses For Kid Safe Chemicals And Raw Materials Purchased Online At LabAlley.com

Go Organic When Buying Chemicals

In an effort to eliminate the use of toxic and harmful chemicals in laboratories and homes in the United States, Lab Alley is promoting the use of safer natural organic solvents (as opposed to petroleum based solvents), food grade alcohols and organic oils instead of more dangerous products such as formaldehyde and methylene chloride.  

Lab Alley is transforming it's product line and marketing efforts in an effort to protect lab technicians, factory workers, medical clinicians, pharmaceutical manufacturers, botanical extract makers and households all across the USA from hazardous toxic chemicals.  Buy high purity chemicals that are safe for science laboratories, homes, industries and schools in the United States.

Safer Chemicals Are Worth The Cost In The Long Run

Americans purchase food grade (natural) solvents, organic oils and organic acids, such as citric acid, online from Lab Ally because they are a safer choice. One of the most common chemicals sold online at LabAlley.com is 1 pint of food grade alcohol (ethanol) which is priced at $30. It is twice as expensive as 1 pint of denatured alcohol ($15) but it is a much safer alternative for certain uses related to human consumption. 

Buy Kid Safe Chemicals In Bulk

High quality, high purity lab chemicals, safe and organic household cleaning chemicals, eco-friendly workshop solvents, research chemicals, production chemicals and science chemicals are for sale in bulk from Lab Alley at wholesale prices.

Providing Safer Chemicals And Alternatives To Traditional Harsher Chemicals

Many consumers in the United States purchase high purity, high quality and safer chemicals from Lab Alley so that they can make their own toothpaste, cleaning solution, perfume, cosmetic products, herbal medicine or botanical extract. Chemicals buyers In the U.S. who want to protect their families, their employees and themselves, know that if they make their own non-toxic cleaning product, they will know what is in the their cleaning solution. Craftsmen, laboratory workers, farmers, universities and biotech companies order safer chemicals online at LabAlley.com because quality and purity matters. Lab Alley has a complete line of medicinal plant extraction grade solvents

It is important to know how to use household chemicals safely. If you have questions or concerns about the safety of the chemicals sold by Lab Alley, call 512-668-9918 or click here to contact us. At Lab Ally, safety comes first. When you expose your body to chemicals, you should try to use an eco-friendly and safer alternative whenever possible.

Not all household products sold in stores in the United States are safe. Lab Alley sells many safe hydrogen peroxide products, safe alcohols and safe solvents that are classified as "Food Grade". Food Grade chemicals or solvents are the highest purity and quality and are not denatured or mixed or manufactured with any toxic substances. Food Grade chemicals are of the highest quality and safe for human consumption in a very limited way. 

Lab Alley sells many different types of solvents and chemicals that are classified as organic, food grade, natural and green. As 2020 commences, this trend towards the use of green solvents and biosolvents is an uplifting phenomenon and a sure indication that United States citizens are on the right path to a sustainable future. Americans buy safe chemicals online from LabAlley.com because they know that the use of eco-friendly chemicals is the right choice for health and environmental reasons.

Lab Alley sells green solvents and biosolvents such as Food Grade Ethanol which is processed from agricultural crops, primarily corn.  Americans purchase many safe chemicals from Lab Alley. The most famous of natural, eco-friendly cleaners is vinegar. Vinegar has been used as a universal solvent and medicine by United States citizens since the times of George Washington. Vinegar, is water-based solution (aqueous solution) containing about 5% acetic acid.  Vinegar is an aqueous solution of acetic acid and trace chemicals that may include flavorings. Vinegar typically contains 5–20% acetic acid by volume. Lab Alley sells safe Food Grade (FCC) acetic acid online here.

There are many types of vinegar, depending upon the source materials. Vinegar is now mainly used in the culinary arts: as a flavorful, acidic cooking ingredient, or in pickling.  As the most easily manufactured mild acid, it has historically had a wide variety of industrial and domestic uses (such as its use as a household cleaner).  To buy 4% acetic acid, click here. Shop for safe acids here.

These high purity chemicals are used to make perfumes, drain cleaners, medicines, surface cleaners such as liquid bleach which is Sodium Hypochlorite, pest control products, bleach, nail polish remover, medicinal plant or herbal extracts, soap, toothpaste, shampoo, botanical oils and much more. Lab Alley sells two chemicals used to make Alka-Seltzer, citric acid and sodium bicarbonate.

Americans are using the Internet to learn more about the ingredients used to make safer products to protect their families and children. Mothers buy food grade hydrogen peroxide to use in their homes because they know that their are toxic stabilizers added to most hydrogen peroxide products sold at pharmacies. Small businesses that make non-toxic, organic, and natural perfumes and skin care products buy organic coconut oil from Lab Alley because it is a safer alternative than petroleum based chemicals. Experienced soap makers in the U.S. purchase extremely high purity sodium hydroxide and safe potassium hydroxide online at LabAlley.com.

Selecting Products With Kid Safe Chemical Ingredients

The customer service department at Lab Alley helps U.S. consumers and corporate purchasing managers make prudent chemical purchasing decisions based on safety. Lab Alley is making an effort to assist manufacturing companies in their use of safer chemicals in production.

Lab Alley chemical experts help customers identify and choose the safest chemicals to make commercial or personal products,  without sacrificing purity, quality, cost or performance.  The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) Safer Choice label, also performs the same service.

When a product has the Safer Choice label, it means that every intentionally-added ingredient in the product has been evaluated by EPA scientists. Only the safest possible functional ingredients are allowed in products with the Safer Choice label. To protect your family and your pets, you can trust that the products with the Safer Choice label meet the EPA's stringent health and environmental criteria. 

CleanGredients is a definitive online database of chemical ingredients whose formulations have been pre-approved by the U.S. EPA to meet the criteria of their Safer Choice Standard. These products include residential, institutional, industrial, and janitorial cleaning products.

Safe chemicals purchased online at LabAlley.com are used to make healthy foods and invigorating oils. They are used to clean bathrooms, carpets and manufacturing equipment. Safe chemicals sold by LabAlley.com include a wide range of products for consumer, laboratory and industrial use.  LabAlley.com sells chemicals that are used to make hand soaps, herbal tinctures, degreasers, topical ointments, skin peels, dish detergents and plant nutrients. You can buy Soap Grade Sodium Hydroxide here and Soap Grade Potassium Hydroxide here

Safer Choice is a voluntary partnership program that is grounded in more than 40 years of EPA experience in evaluating the human health and environmental characteristics of chemicals. Click here to read the Safer Chemicals Ingredients List (SCIL).  As of January 2015, more than 2,000 products qualify to carry the Safer Choice label. Businesses can apply to become partners by submitting their products to the Safer Choice program for review.  

To download the EPA’s Safer Choice Standard (formerly, the ‘DfE Standard for Safer Products), click here.

Safe antimicrobial chemicals purchased online at LabAlley.com are classified as agents that can either be bactericidal, which kill bacteria, or bacteriostatic, which slow down the growth of bacteria. One of the most popular antimicrobial agents sold online at LabAlley.com is Anhydrous Food Grade Citric Acid. Lab Alley also sells other safe chemicals that can be used to destroy microorganisms, especially a bacterium causing disease or fermentation. Best sellers include 200 Proof Ethanol, Food Grade Hydrogen Peroxide, High Concentration Isopropanol, Lab Grade Lactic Acid And Sodium Bisulfate.

Natural And Man-Made Chemical Toxicity And Safety

Artificial compounds and man-made chemicals have transformed many industries in the U.S., including the pharmaceutical industry and the food and beverage industry. LabAlley.com sells natural chemicals like citric acid which is found in lemons and limes. LabAlley.com also sells man-made chemicals such as ethylene glycol

Consumers in the USA often conclude that natural chemicals are safer than man-made (synthetic) chemicals but their is more to the topic than meets the eye. Learn about the advantages and disadvantages of natural chemicals and synthetic chemicals, here

In the USA, the terms 'poison' and 'chemical' have often interchangeable to consumers. Chemicals can be man-made or natural but these terms are not a classification of safety or toxicity. Dealing with chemical risk is challenging to all Americans as well as the EPA. Most of the chemicals currently sold in the USA have not been tested properly for their effects on the health of humans or animals. 

Toxic chemicals are used to manufacture furniture, food, beverages, rugs, toys, cosmetics, personal care products and household cleaners. Advocacy groups like the Natural Resources Defense Council are pressuring U.S. legislators to  close loopholes and reform outdated chemical-safety laws that are constantly exploited by the companies and attorneys in the chemical industry. Attorneys at the NRDC use the legal process to press the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and state governments to take a leadership role in restricting the sale and use of dangerous and toxic chemicals. Keeping hazardous chemicals out away from those who misuse these chemicals is a responsibility the Department Of Homeland Security

The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development helps countries in developing and implementing policies and instruments that make their systems for managing chemical safety, efficient and robust as possible, while protecting human health and the environment.

Due to increase in supplies of solar, wind, and other forms of renewable electricity, U.S. scientists and companies are starting to make chemicals with using oil as the feedstock. GreenScreen is is a method of comparative Chemical Hazard Assessment (CHA) that is used for identifying chemicals of high concern and safer alternatives.

LabAlley.com does not sell certain man-made chemicals such as N-Methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) because it is considered to be a reproductive toxicant and dangerous solvent. Naturally occurring chemicals can indeed be more toxic than man-made chemicals. In some cases, the dosage of a chemical. Any chemical, natural or man-made, given in large quantities, can cause health problems and even death.

Chemicals of substantial public health concern around the world include benzene, asbestos, arsenic, Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS), hazardous and toxic air pollutants, cadmium, formaldehyde, dioxin, Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs), excess fluoride, lead, mercury and hazardous pesticidesFood packaging often contains PFAS, which have been linked to significant health problems. U.S. firms such as Subway have decided to remove controversial chemicals such as Azodicarbonamide from the food they manufacture. Kraft decided to removing Yellow No. 5 (tartrazine) and No. 6 from some of their Macaroni & Cheese products.

DIY Hand Sanitizers, Face Masks And Disinfecting Sprays | DIY Alternatives for When Stores Are Out of Virus-Fighting Products
April 4, 2020

DIY hand sanitizers were the index species in the current wave of shelf extinctions, with usually plentiful supplies of Purell gel and similar products vanishing fast. Even without sanitizers, epidemiologists stress there is an exceedingly reliable alternative that works just as well: wash your hands with soap and water. Read more here.

CleanSmart Disinfectant Spray Mist Kills 99.9% Of Viruses, Bacteria, Germs, Mold And Fungus

CleanSmart Disinfectant Spray Mist leaves no chemical residue and is great to clean and sanitize CPAP masks and parts. Simply spray, no rinsing, no wiping, air dry. Safe for food contact on counters and all appliances. Free of alcohol, ammonia, bleach, fragrances and dyes. 100% safe to spray and store around children and it breaks down to saline after use. Read more here.

Chemical Disinfection Of Virus‐Contaminated Surfaces

Chemical disinfection is widely practiced as a means of controlling and preventing the spread of infectious diseases. Although disinfection of bacteria has been widely studied, much less attention has been paid to the virucidal potential of commonly used disinfectants in spite of the low infective dose of many human pathogenic viruses. This review considers what is known about the disinfection of viruses and the virucidal properties of different classes of disinfectant chemicals. It focuses on virus disinfection from a practical viewpoint and also critically evaluates the testing techniques currently used for examining the efficacy of disinfectant products. Read more here.

Factors In The Selection Of Surface Disinfectants For Use In A Laboratory Animal Setting

Because surface disinfectants are an important means of pathogen control within laboratory animal facilities, these products must have an appropriate spectrum of antimicrobial activity. However, many other factors must also be considered, including effects on human health, environmental safety, and animal behavior. Aqueous solutions of sodium hypochlorite often are considered to be the ‘gold standard’ for surface disinfection, but these products can be corrosive, caustic, and aversive in odor. Read more here.